UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

 

Washington, DC  20549

 

FORM 10-K

 

[X] Annual Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

 

For the Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2014

 

[   ] Transition Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

 

Commission File Number

001-09071

 

BFC Financial Corporation

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

 

 

Florida

 

59‑2022148

(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S Employer Identification No.)

 

 

 

 

 

401 East Las Olas Boulevard, Suite 800

 

 

Fort Lauderdale, Florida

 

33301

(Address of principal executive office)

 

(Zip Code)

 

 

 

(954) 940-4900

(Registrant's telephone number, including area code)

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

None.

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

 

 

 

Class A Common Stock, $.01 par Value

 

Class B Common Stock, $.01 par Value

 

Preferred Share Purchase Rights

(Title of Class)

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.YES [  ]  NO [X]

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.  YES [  ]  NO [X]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. YES [X]  NO [  ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes [X]  No [  ]

 

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§ 229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.   [X]


 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company.  See the definitions of “large accelerated filer”, “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer   [  ]Accelerated filer [X]Non-accelerated filer [  ]    Smaller reporting company [    ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).YES [  ]  NO [X]

On June 30, 2014, the aggregate market value of the registrant’s voting common equity held by non-affiliates was $195.3 million computed by reference to the closing price of the registrant’s Class A Common Stock on such date. The registrant does not have any non-voting common equity.

 

The number of shares outstanding of each of the registrant’s classes of common stock as of March 11, 2015 is as follows:

 

Class A Common Stock of $.01 par value, 76,998,305 shares outstanding.
Class B Common Stock of $.01 par value,  10,147,184  shares outstanding.

 

Documents Incorporated by Reference

 

Portions of the registrant’s Definitive Proxy Statement on Schedule 14A relating to the registrant’s 2015 Annual Meeting of Shareholders are incorporated by reference into Part III of this Form 10-K.

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

Arch 31, 2013

 

 

 

 

 

BFC Financial Corporation

Annual Report on Form 10-K for the Year Ended December 31, 2014

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

 

 

PART I

Page

 

 

 

Item 1.

Business

 

 

 

Item 1A

Risk Factors

36 

 

 

 

Item 1B

Unresolved Staff Comments

58 

 

 

 

Item 2

Properties

58 

 

 

 

Item 3

Legal Proceedings

59 

 

 

 

Item 4

Mine Safety Disclosure

62 

 

 

 

 

PART II

 

 

 

 

Item 5

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Results of Operations

63 

 

 

 

Item 6

Selected Financial Data

66 

 

 

 

Item 7

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

68 

 

 

 

Item 7A

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

126 

 

 

 

Item 8

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

F-1 to F-108

 

 

 

Item 9

Changes in and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

128 

 

 

 

Item 9A

Controls and Procedures

128 

 

 

 

Item 9B

Other Information

129

 

 

 

 

PART III

 

 

 

 

Item 10

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

130 

 

 

 

Item 11

Executive Compensation

130 

 

 

 

Item 12

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

130 

 

 

 

Item 13

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

130 

 

 

 

Item 14

Principal Accounting Fees and Services

130 

 

 

 

 

PART IV

 

 

 

 

Item 15

Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules

131 

 

 

 

 

SIGNATURES

137 

 

 

 

 

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PART I

 

ITEM 1. BUSINESS

 

This document contains forward-looking statements based largely on current expectations of BFC Financial Corporation (“BFC” and, unless otherwise indicated or the context otherwise requires, “we”, “us”, “our” or the “Company”) that involve a number of risks and uncertainties. All opinions, forecasts, projections, future plans or other statements, other than statements of historical fact, are forward-looking statements and can be identified by the use of words or phrases such as “plans,” “believes,” “will,” “expects,” “anticipates,” “intends,” “estimates,” “our view,” “we see,” “would” and words and phrases of similar import. The forward looking statements in this document are also forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”), and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), and involve substantial risks and uncertainties. We can give no assurance that such expectations will prove to have been correct. Actual results, performance, or achievements could differ materially from those contemplated, expressed, or implied by the forward-looking statements contained herein. These forward-looking statements are based largely on our expectations and are subject to a number of risks and uncertainties that are subject to change based on factors which are, in many instances, beyond our control. When considering forward-looking statements, the reader should keep in mind the risks, uncertainties and other cautionary statements made in this report.  The reader should not place undue reliance on any forward-looking statement, which speaks only as of the date made.  This document also contains information regarding the past performance of investments and operations, and the reader should note that prior or current performance is not a guarantee or indication of future performance.

 

Some factors which may affect the accuracy of the forward-looking statements apply generally to the industries in which our subsidiaries operate, including the resort development and vacation ownership industries in which Bluegreen Corporation (“Bluegreen”) operates, and the investment, development, and asset management and real estate-related industries in which BBX Capital Corporation (“BBX Capital”) operates, while other factors apply more specifically to BFC, including, but not limited to, the following:

 

·

BFC has limited sources of cash and is dependent upon dividends from its subsidiaries to fund its operations; BFC’s subsidiaries may not be in a position to pay dividends or otherwise make a determination to pay dividends to its shareholders; dividend payments may be subject to certain restrictions, including restrictions contained in debt instruments; any payment of dividends by a subsidiary of BFC is subject to declaration by such subsidiary’s board of directors or managers (which, in the case of BBX Capital, is comprised of a majority of independent directors under the listing standards of the NYSE) as well as the boards of directors of both BBX Capital and BFC in the case of dividend payments by Woodbridge Holdings, LLC (“Woodbridge”) and the directors of Bluegreen in the case of Bluegreen; and dividend decisions may not be made in BFC’s interests;

·

risks associated with BFC’s current business strategy, including the risk that BFC will not be in a position to provide strategic support to or additional investments in its affiliated entities or that such support or additional investments will not achieve the anticipated benefits, and the risk that BFC will not be in a position to make new investments or that any investments made, including BFC’s investment in Renin Holdings LLC (“Renin”), will not prove to be advantageous;

·

the risks and uncertainties affecting BFC and its subsidiaries, and their respective results, operations, markets, products, services and business strategies, including with respect to BBX Capital, risks associated with its ability to successfully implement its currently anticipated plans and uncertainties regarding BBX Capital’s ability to generate earnings under its new business strategy;

·

risks associated with acquisitions, asset or subsidiary dispositions or other strategic transactions or debt or equity financings which BFC may consider or pursue from time to time;

·

the risk that creditors of BFC’s subsidiaries or other third parties may seek to recover from the subsidiaries’ respective parent companies, including BFC, distributions or dividends made by such subsidiaries or other amounts owed by such subsidiaries to such creditors or third parties;

·

BFC’s shareholders’ interests will be diluted if additional shares of BFC’s common stock are issued, and BFC’s investments in its subsidiaries may be diluted if such subsidiaries issue additional shares of stock to the public or persons other than BFC;

·

adverse conditions in the stock market, the public debt market and other capital markets and the impact of such conditions on the activities of BFC and its subsidiaries;

·

the impact of economic conditions on BFC, the price and liquidity of BFC’s common stock and BFC’s ability to obtain additional capital, including the risk that if BFC needs or otherwise believes it is advisable to issue

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debt or equity securities to fund its operations or investments, it may not be possible to issue any such securities on favorable terms, if at all;

·

the performance of entities in which BFC has made investments may not be profitable or their results as anticipated;

·

risks relating to Woodbridge’s April 2013 acquisition of Bluegreen, and the shareholder class action lawsuits relating to the transaction;

·

the uncertainty regarding, and the impact on BFC’s cash position of, the amount of cash that will be required to be paid to former shareholders of Woodbridge Holdings Corporation (“WHC”) who exercised appraisal rights in connection with the 2009 merger between BFC and WHC, including the legal and other professional fees and other costs and expenses of such proceedings;

·

the preparation of financial statements in accordance with GAAP involves making estimates, judgments and assumptions, and any changes in estimates, judgments and assumptions used could have a material adverse impact on the financial condition and operating results of BFC or its subsidiaries;

·

risks related to litigation and other legal proceedings involving BFC and its subsidiaries, including (i) the legal and other professional fees and other costs and expenses of such proceedings, as well as the impact of any finding of liability or damages on the financial condition and operating results of BFC or its subsidiaries and (ii) with respect to the pending action brought by the SEC against BBX Capital and its Chairman, who also serves as BFC’s Chairman, reputational risks and risks relating to the potential loss of the services of BFC’s Chairman;

·

the risk and uncertainties described below with respect to BBX Capital and Bluegreen; and

·

BFC’s success at managing the risks involved in the foregoing.

 

With respect to Bluegreen, the risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to:

 

·

Bluegreen’s business and operations, including its ability to market VOIs, is subject to risks related to general economic conditions and the availability of financing;

·

The vacation ownership and hospitality industries are highly competitive, and Bluegreen may not be able to compete successfully;

·

Bluegreen would incur substantial losses and Bluegreen’s liquidity position could be adversely impacted if the customers to whom Bluegreen provides financing default on their obligations;

·

While Bluegreen has attempted to structure its business to reduce its need for and reliance on financing for liquidity in the short term, there is no assurance that Bluegreen’s business and profitability will not in the future depend on its ability to obtain financing, which may not be available on favorable terms, or at all; 

·

Bluegreen's indebtedness may impact its financial condition and results of operations, and the terms of Bluegreen's indebtedness may limit its activities;

·

The ratings of third-party rating agencies could adversely impact Bluegreen’s ability to obtain, renew or extend credit facilities, or otherwise raise funds;

·

Bluegreen’s future success depends on its ability to market its products and services successfully and efficiently and Bluegreen’s marketing expenses may increase;

·

Bluegreen may not be successful in increasing or expanding its capital-light business relationships, and its capital-light activities, including fee based, sales and marketing, just-in-time VOI arrangements, and Secondary Market Sales activities, and such activities may not be profitable, which would have an adverse impact on Bluegreen’s results of operations and financial condition;

·

Bluegreen’s results of operations and financial condition may be materially and adversely impacted if Bluegreen does not continue to participate in exchange networks and other strategic alliances with third parties or if Bluegreen’s customers are not satisfied with the networks in which Bluegreen participates or Bluegreen’s strategic alliances;

·

The resale market for VOIs could adversely affect Bluegreen’s business;

·

Bluegreen is subject to the risks of the real estate market and the risks associated with real estate development, including a decline in real estate values and a deterioration of other conditions relating to the real estate market and real estate development;

·

Adverse outcomes in legal or other regulatory proceedings, including claims for development-related defects, could adversely affect Bluegreen’s financial condition and operating results;

·

Bluegreen may be adversely affected by extensive federal, state and local laws and regulations and changes in applicable laws and regulations, including with respect to the imposition of additional taxes on operations. In addition, results of audits of Bluegreen’s tax returns or those of Bluegreen’s subsidiaries may have a material adverse impact on Bluegreen’s financial condition;

·

Environmental liabilities, including claims with respect to mold or hazardous or toxic substances, could have a material adverse impact on Bluegreen’s financial condition and operating results;

·

A failure to maintain the integrity of internal or customer data could result in damage to Bluegreen's reputation and/or subject Bluegreen to costs, fines, or lawsuits;

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·

Bluegreen’s technology requires updating and the failure to keep pace with developments in technology could impair Bluegreen's operations or competitive position;

·

There are inherent uncertainties involved in estimates, judgments and assumptions used in the preparation of financial statements in accordance with GAAP. Any changes in estimates, judgments and assumptions used could have a material adverse impact on Bluegreen’s operating results and financial condition; and

·

The loss of the services of Bluegreen’s key management and personnel could adversely affect its business.

 

With respect to BBX Capital, the risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to:

 

·

the impact of economic, competitive and other factors affecting BBX Capital and its subsidiaries, including their respective markets, products and services, decreases in real estate values, and increased unemployment or high unemployment rates on its business generally, the value of its assets, the ability of BBX Capital’s borrowers to service their obligations and the value of collateral securing outstanding loans; 

·

the risk that loan losses will continue and the risks of additional charge-offs, impairments and required increases in BBX Capital’s allowance for loan losses; 

·

the impact of and expenses associated with litigation, including, but not limited to, the pending action brought by the SEC against BBX Capital and its Chairman;

·

adverse conditions in the stock market, the public debt market and other financial and credit markets, and the impact of such conditions on BBX Capital’s activities;

·

the risks associated with the impact of periodic valuations of BBX Capital’s assets for impairment;

·

the risks related to BBX Capital’s ability to successfully implement its current business plans, which may not be realized as anticipated, if at all, or which may not be profitable;

·

the risks that the assets retained by BBX Capital in CAM and FAR may not be monetized at the values currently ascribed to them, and that BBX Capital’s investments in real estate developments, real estate joint ventures and operating businesses, including BBX Capital’s investment in Woodbridge,  BBX Sweet Holdings and its acquisition with BFC of Renin Corp., as well as any acquisitions or investments that BBX Capital may make in the future may not achieve the returns anticipated or may not be profitable;

·

the risk that BBX Capital’s investments in real estate developments and real estate joint ventures will increase its exposure to downturns in the real estate and housing industries and expose it to risks, including that joint venture partners may be financially unable or unwilling to fulfill their obligations under joint venture agreements requiring BBX Capital to provide financial or other support;

·

failure of third party suppliers and manufacturers to provide quality products on commercially reasonable terms could adversely affect the businesses of Renin and BBX Sweet Holdings;

·

Renin’s indebtedness may impact its financial condition and results of operations, and the terms of Renin’s indebtedness may limit its activities, the risk that Renin will not meet its financial covenants and the risk that BBX Capital and BFC may be required to make further capital contributions to Renin. Further BBX Capital’s investment in Renin exposes it to foreign currency exchange risk of the U.S. dollar compared to the Canadian dollar and Britain Pound; and

·

BBX Capital’s success at managing the risks involved in the foregoing.

 

In addition to the risks and factors identified above, reference is also made to the other risks and factors detailed in this report and the other reports filed by BFC and BBX Capital with the SEC, including those disclosed in the “Risk Factors” section of this report. The Company cautions that the foregoing factors are not exclusive.

 

The Company

 

BFC is a holding company whose principal holdings include a 51% equity interest in BBX Capital and its subsidiaries and a direct 54% equity interest in Woodbridge, which owns 100% of Bluegreen and its subsidiaries.  As described below, BBX Capital owns the remaining 46% equity interest in Woodbridge. BFC also holds interests in other investments and subsidiaries as described herein, including its investment in Renin, a joint venture entity owned 81% by BBX Capital and 19% by BFC.  The Company reports the results of its continuing operations through five segments: Bluegreen Vacations; BBX; FAR; Renin; and Sweet Holdings.

 

GAAP requires that BFC consolidate the financial results of the entities in which it has controlling interests, including BBX Capital, Woodbridge and Bluegreen.  As a consequence, the assets and liabilities of all such entities are presented on a consolidated basis in BFC’s financial statements. However, except as otherwise noted, the debts and obligations of the consolidated entities, including BBX Capital, Woodbridge, and Bluegreen, are not direct obligations of BFC and are non-recourse to BFC. Similarly, the assets of those entities are not available to BFC absent a dividend or distribution from those entities (and, in the case of Bluegreen, a subsequent dividend or distribution by Woodbridge). The recognition by BFC of income from controlled entities is determined based on the total percent of economic ownership in those entities. At December 31, 2014, BFC had an approximately 51% economic ownership

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interest in BBX Capital and, through Woodbridge, without regard to its indirect interest in Woodbridge through BBX Capital, an approximately 54% economic ownership interest in Bluegreen.  BFC’s economic ownership interest in BBX Capital and Bluegreen set forth above and elsewhere herein is calculated in accordance with the requirements of GAAP and, therefore, excludes unvested restricted securities granted by the applicable company to such company’s officers and directors.

 

As discussed below, BankAtlantic’s Community Banking, Investments, Tax Certificates, and Capital Services components are recorded as discontinued operations as a result of BBX Capital’s sale of BankAtlantic, BBX Capital’s former banking subsidiary, to BB&T Corporation (“BB&T”) during July 2012.  Discontinued operations of BFC also include the results of Bluegreen Communities, substantially all of the assets of which were sold by Bluegreen during May 2012, and Cypress Creek Holdings, LLC (“Cypress Creek Holdings”).  See Note 4 to the consolidated financial statements for further discussion of discontinued operations.

 

As of December 31, 2014, we had total consolidated assets of approximately $1.4 billion and shareholders’ equity attributable to BFC of approximately $252.9 million.  Net income attributable to BFC for the year ended December 31, 2014 was approximately $13.9 million.  Net income attributable to BFC for the year ended December 31, 2013 was approximately $29.1 million.  Net income attributable to BFC for the year ended December 31, 2012 was approximately $165.8 million and included a gain on sale of BankAtlantic of approximately $293.4 million. 

 

BFC’s business strategy has been to invest in and acquire businesses in diverse industries either directly or through controlled subsidiaries. In recent years, BFC has focused on providing strategic support to its existing investments with a view to the improved performance of the organization as a whole.  Initiatives in furtherance of this strategy include the April 2013 Bluegreen merger, as well as BFC’s investment with BBX Capital in Renin, in each case as described in further detail below. We have also from time to time pursued and expect to continue to consider alternatives for increasing our ownership of BBX Capital. As previously discussed, we entered into a merger agreement with BBX Capital during May 2013 which provided for BBX Capital to be merged with and become a wholly owned subsidiary of BFC, however, the merger agreement was mutually terminated during December 2014 as a result of the inability to obtain the listing of BFC’s Class A Common Stock on a national securities exchange as required by the terms of the merger agreement.  Additionally, we may invest in operating businesses and real estate joint ventures for the development of residential and commercial real estate projects, including those in which our affiliates may participate.  In furtherance of this goal or otherwise as part of our business and investment strategy, we expect to evaluate various financing transactions, including debt or equity financings as well as other alternative sources of new capital. BFC’s investments or acquisitions, and the business and investment strategies of BFC’s subsidiaries, may not prove to be successful or even if successful may not initially generate income, or may generate income on an irregular basis and may involve a long term investment, causing our results of operations to vary significantly on a quarterly basis. BFC or BBX Capital may consider disposition of all or a portion of its asset investments or subsidiaries, including transactions involving Sweet Holdings, Renin, or Bluegreen, either directly or indirectly through a transaction involving Woodbridge.  These may include, among other alternatives, a future sale or spin-off or transactions involving public or private issuances of debt or equity securities which might result in the ownership of less than 100% of the companies. For additional information regarding the strategic activities taken by BFC during the past three years and other events which have had a material impact on our operating results and financial condition, see “Strategic Transactions and Other Events” below and “Part II-Item 7 - Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.”

 

Strategic Transactions and Other Events

 

BBX Sweet Holdings’ Acquisitions

 

In December 2013, a wholly-owned subsidiary of BBX Capital, BBX Sweet Holdings, LLC, acquired Hoffman’s Chocolates and its subsidiaries Boca Bons, LLC (“Boca Bons”) and S&F Good Fortunes, LLC (“Good Fortunes”) (collectively “Hoffman’s”).  Hoffman’s had total assets of $5.3 million as of the acquisition date and is a manufacturer of gourmet chocolates, with retail locations in South Florida.   In January 2014, BBX Sweet Holdings acquired Williams and Bennett. Williams and Bennett had total assets of $1.3 million as of the acquisition date and is a manufacturer of chocolate products serving boutique retailers, big box chains, department stores, national resort properties, corporate customers, and private label brands.  In July 2014, BBX Sweet Holdings acquired Helen Grace Chocolates (“Helen Grace”), a California based manufacturer of premium chocolate confections, chocolate bars, chocolate candies and truffles with total assets at the acquisition date of $2.7 million.  In July 2014, BBX Sweet Holdings acquired Jer’s Chocolates (“Jer’s”), a California based distributor of peanut butter chocolate products internationally and in the United States.  Jer’s had total assets of $0.7 million as of the acquisition date.   In October 2014, BBX Sweet Holdings acquired the outstanding common shares of Anastasia Confections (“Anastasia”).  Anastasia is a premium confections’ company based in Orlando, Florida that manufactures gourmet coconut and

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chocolate candy, salt water taffy, and other chocolate gift products.  Anastasia had total assets of $3.3 million at the acquisition date.

 

Acquisition of Renin Corporation

 

On October 30, 2013, Renin Holdings, LLC (“Renin”), a newly formed joint venture owned 81% by BBX Capital and 19% by BFC, acquired substantially all of the assets and certain liabilities of Renin Corp for approximately $12.8 million (the Renin Transaction”).  Renin, which had $24 million of total assets as of October 30, 2013, manufactures interior closet doors, wall décor, hardware and fabricated glass products and operates through headquarters in Canada and two  manufacturing, assembly and distribution facilities in Canada and the United States as well as a sales and distribution facility in the United Kingdom.

 

Termination of BFC-BBX Capital Merger Agreement 

 

During May 2013, BFC and BBX Capital entered into a merger agreement which provided for BBX Capital to be merged into and become a wholly subsidiary of BFC.   The merger agreement was terminated during December 2014 as a result of the inability to obtain the listing of BFC’s Class A Common Stock on a national securities exchange, which was a condition to closing the merger.

 

Woodbridge Acquisition of Bluegreen

 

On April 2, 2013, Bluegreen merged with a wholly-owned subsidiary of Woodbridge in a cash merger transaction (sometimes hereinafter referred to as the “Bluegreen merger” or the “Bluegreen cash merger”).  Pursuant to the terms of the merger agreement, Bluegreen’s shareholders (other than Woodbridge) received consideration of $10.00 in cash for each share of Bluegreen’s common stock that they held at the effective time of the merger, including unvested restricted securities. In addition, each option to acquire shares of Bluegreen’s common stock that was outstanding at the effective time of the merger, whether vested or unvested, was canceled in exchange for a cash payment to the holder in an amount equal to the excess, if any, of the $10.00 per share merger consideration over the exercise price per share of the option. The aggregate merger consideration was approximately $149.2 million.  As a result of the merger, Bluegreen, which was the surviving corporation of the merger, became a wholly-owned subsidiary of Woodbridge.  Prior to the merger, Woodbridge, which was a wholly-owned subsidiary of BFC at that time, owned approximately 54% of Bluegreen’s outstanding common stock.

 

In connection with the financing of the merger, BFC and Woodbridge entered into a Purchase Agreement with BBX Capital on April 2, 2013 (the “Purchase Agreement”).  Pursuant to the terms of the Purchase Agreement, BBX Capital invested $71.75 million in Woodbridge in connection with the closing of the merger in exchange for a 46% equity interest in Woodbridge. BFC continues to hold the remaining 54% of Woodbridge’s outstanding equity interests. BBX Capital’s investment in Woodbridge consisted of $60 million in cash, which was utilized to pay a portion of the aggregate merger consideration, and a promissory note in Woodbridge’s favor in the principal amount of $11.75 million (the “Note”). The Note has a term of five years, accrues interest at a rate of 5% per annum and provides for payments of interest only on a quarterly basis during the term of the Note, with all outstanding amounts being due and payable at the end of the five-year term. During 2014, BBX Capital paid to Woodbridge a total of approximately $441,000 of interest on the Note.  In connection with BBX Capital’s investment in Woodbridge, BFC and BBX Capital entered into an Amended and Restated Operating Agreement of Woodbridge, which sets forth BFC’s and BBX Capital’s respective rights as members of Woodbridge and provides for, among other things, unanimity on certain specified “major decisions” and for distributions by Woodbridge to be made on a pro rata basis in accordance with BFC’s and BBX Capital’s respective percentage equity interests in Woodbridge. During 2014 and 2013, Bluegreen paid a total of $71.5 million and $47.0 million, respectively in cash dividends to Woodbridge, and Woodbridge declared and paid cash dividends totaling $69.1 million and $44.3 million, respectively, which were allocated pro rata among BFC and BBX Capital based on their percentage ownership interests in Woodbridge.

 

On March 26, 2013, Bluegreen issued $75 million of senior secured notes (the “2013 Notes Payable”) in a private transaction, the proceeds of which, together with approximately $14 million of Bluegreen’s unrestricted cash, were utilized in connection with the funding of the $149.2 million merger consideration indicated above. See Note 15 to the consolidated financial statements for additional information regarding the 2013 Notes Payable.

 

Two consolidated class action lawsuits relating to the merger remain pending.  The plaintiffs in these actions have asserted that the consideration received by Bluegreen’s minority shareholders in the merger was inadequate and unfair, and are seeking to recover damages in connection with the merger. The Company believes that these lawsuits are without merit and intends to vigorously defend the actions.  See Item 3-Legal Proceedings and Note 17 to the consolidated financial statements for additional information regarding these actions.

 

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Sale of BankAtlantic

 

On July 31, 2012, BBX Capital completed the sale to BB&T of all of the issued and outstanding shares of capital stock of BankAtlantic, the former wholly-owned banking subsidiary of BBX Capital (the stock sale and related transactions are referred to in this report as the “BankAtlantic Sale” or the “BB&T Transaction”).  The BankAtlantic Sale was consummated pursuant to the terms of a definitive agreement, dated November 1, 2011, between BBX Capital and BB&T, as amended on March 13, 2012 (the “BB&T Agreement”). The March 13, 2012 amendment amended the previously contemplated terms of the transaction to, among other things, provide for the assumption by BB&T of BBX Capital’s $285.4 million in principal amount of then-outstanding trust preferred securities (“TruPS”) obligations. 

 

Pursuant to the BB&T Agreement, prior to the closing of the BankAtlantic Sale, BankAtlantic formed two subsidiaries, CAM and FAR. BankAtlantic contributed to FAR certain performing and non-performing loans, tax certificates, and real estate owned that had an aggregate carrying value on BankAtlantic’s Consolidated Statement of Financial Condition of approximately $346 million as of July 31, 2012 (the date the BB&T Transaction was consummated).  FAR assumed all liabilities related to these assets. BankAtlantic also contributed approximately $50 million in cash to FAR on July 31, 2012 and thereafter distributed all of the membership interests in FAR to BBX Capital.  At the closing of the BankAtlantic Sale, BBX Capital transferred to BB&T 95% of the outstanding preferred membership interests in FAR in connection with BB&T’s assumption of BBX Capital’s then-outstanding approximately $285 million of TruPS obligations. BBX Capital continues to hold the remaining 5% of FAR’s preferred membership interests.  BB&T will hold its 95% preferred interest in the net cash flows of FAR until such time as it has recovered $285 million in preference amount plus a priority return of LIBOR + 2.00% per annum on any unpaid preference amount. At that time, BB&T’s interest in FAR will terminate, and BBX Capital will thereafter own 100% of FAR through its ownership of FAR’s Class R units.  BBX Capital entered into an incremental $35 million guarantee in BB&T’s favor to further assure BB&T’s recovery of the $285 million preferred interest within seven years.  At December 31, 2014, BB&T’s preferred interest in FAR was approximately $12.3 million. 

 

Prior to the closing of the BankAtlantic Sale, BankAtlantic contributed to CAM certain commercial loans, commercial real estate owned and previously written off assets that had an aggregate carrying value on BankAtlantic’s Consolidated Statement of Financial Condition of $125 million as of July 31, 2012. CAM assumed all liabilities related to these assets.  BankAtlantic also contributed $82 million of cash to CAM on July 31, 2012.  Prior to the closing of the BankAtlantic Sale, BankAtlantic distributed all of the membership interests in CAM to BBX Capital.  CAM remains a wholly-owned subsidiary of BBX Capital.

 

Sale of Bluegreen Communities

 

On May 4, 2012, Bluegreen sold substantially all of the assets that comprised its former residential communities business, Bluegreen Communities, to Southstar Development Partners, Inc. (“Southstar”) for a purchase price of approximately $29.0 million in cash.  Assets excluded from the sale included primarily Bluegreen Communities’ notes receivable portfolio.  Certain liabilities related to Bluegreen Communities were also retained by Bluegreen. Bluegreen Communities is classified as a discontinued operation for all periods presented in the accompanying consolidated financial statements.  See Note 4 to the consolidated financial statements for additional information regarding discontinued operations.

 

Acquisition of Benihana by Safflower

 

BFC held a significant investment in Benihana until August 2012 when Benihana was acquired by Safflower Holdings Corp. for a cash purchase price of $16.30 per outstanding share of Benihana’s common stock.  BFC received approximately $24.5 million in exchange for the 1,505,330 shares of Benihana’s common stock that it held at the effective time of the transaction.

 

Prior to Safflower’s acquisition of Benihana, BFC sold approximately 77,000 shares of Benihana’s common stock during July and August 2012 pursuant to the terms of a Rule 10b5-1 Trading Plan and received net proceeds from such sales of approximately $1.25 million.

 

BFC recognized a gain on sale of approximately $9.3 million in connection with its sales of shares of Benihana’s common stock during July and August 2012 and the disposition of its remaining shares of Benihana’s common stock pursuant to the merger between Benihana and Safflower during August 2012. In addition, during each of the first three quarters of 2012, BFC received approximately $127,000 of dividend payments with respect to the shares of Benihana’s common stock which BFC owned at that time. 

 

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Additional Information

 

BFC’s corporate website is www.bfcfinancial.com. BFC’s annual report on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, and all amendments to those reports, are available free of charge through BFC’s website, as soon as reasonably practicable after such material is electronically filed with, or furnished to, the SEC. BFC’s website and the information contained on or connected to it are not incorporated into this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

See Note 1 – “Basis of Financial Statement Presentation” to the Notes to the Company’s Consolidated Financial Statements included in Part II, Item 8 of this report for a further discussion of the presentation of the Company’s results of operations, including the impact of the events described above on such presentations.

 

Business Segments

 

Following BBX Capital’s sale of BankAtlantic during July 2012 and the disposition of BFC’s investment in Benihana in connection with Safflower’s acquisition of Benihana during August 2012 and as a result of Woodbridge’s reduced real estate operating activities, BFC reorganized its reportable segments to better align its segments with its and its subsidiaries’ operations.   As a result of such reorganization, we currently report the results of our continuing operations through five segments: Bluegreen Vacations; BBX; FAR; Renin, and Sweet Holdings. BFC previously had a BFC Activities reporting segment and a Real Estate Operations segment.   The BFC Activities segment included BFC’s corporate overhead and selling, general and administrative expenses, including the expenses of Woodbridge unrelated to real estate, BFC’s investment in Benihana, and certain other investments and subsidiaries.  The Real Estate Operations segment included the subsidiaries through which Woodbridge historically conducted its real estate business activities. BFC’s management modified its measure of segment operating profit to exclude the items that were previously classified within the BFC Activities segment and the Real Estate Operations segment.  Accordingly, BFC’s segment disclosure has been adjusted to reflect the revised presentation, and the results previously included within BFC Activities and Real Estate Operations have been reclassified to unallocated corporate overhead for all periods presented and are included in the reconciliation of segment amounts to the consolidated amounts. 

 

As previously described, discontinued operations include the results of Bluegreen Communities (which was previously a separate reporting segment), BankAtlantic’s community banking, investment, capital service and tax certificate reporting units (which previously comprised a portion of our former BankAtlantic segment), as well as Cypress Creek Holdings (which was previously part of the former Real Estate Operations reporting segment). See Note 4 to the consolidated financial statements for additional information regarding discontinued operations.

 

The presentation and allocation of the assets, liabilities and results of operations of each segment may not reflect the actual economic costs of the segment as a stand-alone business. If a different basis of allocation were utilized, the relative contributions of the segment might differ but, in management’s view, the relative trends in segments would not likely be impacted.  See also Item 7 of this report, “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and Note 23 contained in Item 8 of this report for a discussion of trends, results of operations, and other relevant information on each segment.

 

The Company evaluates segment performance based on its segment net income (loss).

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Bluegreen Vacations Segment

 

Overview

 

Bluegreen is a sales, marketing and management company focused on the vacation ownership industry. Bluegreen Vacations, which in prior reports was referred to as Bluegreen Resorts, markets, sells and manages vacation ownership interests (“VOIs”) in resorts, which are generally located in popular, “drive-to” vacation destinations, and were either developed or acquired by Bluegreen or developed by others, in which case Bluegreen Vacations earns fees for providing these services. Bluegreen Vacations also earns fees by providing club and property owner’s association management services, mortgage servicing, VOI title services, reservation services, and construction design and development services. In addition, Bluegreen Vacations provides financing to FICO® score-qualified individual purchasers of VOIs, which generates significant interest income for Bluegreen.

 

Previously, Bluegreen also operated a residential communities business (“Bluegreen Communities”), which marketed residential homesites, the majority of which were sold directly to retail customers seeking to build a home generally in the future.  In May 2012, Bluegreen sold substantially all of the assets that comprised Bluegreen Communities to Southstar Development Partners, Inc. (“Southstar”) for a purchase price of approximately $29.0 million in cash. Assets excluded from the sale primarily included Bluegreen Communities’ notes receivable portfolio. In addition, because the transaction was an asset sale, liabilities not assumed by Southstar under the agreement were retained by Bluegreen subsidiaries. The operating results of Bluegreen Communities are presented as a discontinued operation for all periods presented.

 

On April 2, 2013, Woodbridge Holdings, LLC (“Woodbridge”) acquired all of the shares of Bluegreen’s common stock not previously owned by Woodbridge in a cash merger transaction (the “Bluegreen – Woodbridge Cash Merger”).  Pursuant to the terms of the merger agreement between the parties (the “Bluegreen-Woodbridge Cash Merger Agreement”) Bluegreen’s shareholders (other than Woodbridge) received consideration of $10.00 in cash for each share of Bluegreen’s common stock that they held at the effective time of the Bluegreen-Woodbridge Cash Merger, including unvested restricted securities. In addition, each option to acquire shares of Bluegreen’s common stock that was outstanding at the effective time of the Bluegreen-Woodbridge Cash Merger, whether vested or unvested, was canceled in exchange for a cash payment to the holder in an amount equal to the excess, if any, of the $10.00 per share merger consideration over the exercise price per share of the option. The aggregate merger consideration was approximately $149 million.  As a result of the Bluegreen-Woodbridge Cash Merger, Bluegreen became a wholly-owned subsidiary of Woodbridge, and Bluegreen’s common stock ceased trading on the New York Stock Exchange and was deregistered under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.  Prior to the Bluegreen-Woodbridge Cash Merger, Woodbridge owned approximately 54% of Bluegreen’s outstanding common stock. Woodbridge is currently owned 54% by BFC Financial Corporation (OTCQB: BFCF, “BFC”), and 46% by BBX Capital Corporation (NYSE: BBX, “BBX Capital”).

 

Bluegreen issued $75 million of senior secured notes on March 26, 2013 in a private transaction. The $75 million of proceeds from the notes issuance together with $14 million of Bluegreen’s unrestricted cash, as well as $60 million in cash provided by Woodbridge through an investment in Woodbridge by BBX Capital, were used to fund the $149 million merger consideration indicated above.  See Note 15 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information related to the senior secured notes.

 

Two consolidated class action lawsuits relating to the transaction between Woodbridge and Bluegreen are currently pending.   See “Item 3 – Legal Proceedings” for additional information regarding the pending litigation relating to the transaction. 

 

Industry Overview

 

The resorts component of the leisure industry is serviced primarily by two separate alternatives for overnight accommodations: commercial lodging establishments and vacation ownership resorts. Commercial lodging consists principally of hotels and motels in which a room is rented on a nightly, weekly or monthly basis, or rentals of privately-owned condominium units or homes. For many vacationers, particularly those with families, a lengthy stay at a quality commercial lodging establishment can be expensive, and the space provided to such vacationers by these establishments relative to the cost is often not economical. In addition, room rates at commercial lodging establishments are subject to change periodically and availability is often uncertain.  Bluegreen believes that vacation ownership presents an attractive vacation alternative to commercial lodging.

 

Vacation ownership interests were first introduced in Europe in the mid 1960s. Historically, the vacation ownership industry was highly fragmented and dominated by a large number of local and regional resort developers and operators, each with small resort portfolios generally of differing quality.  Bluegreen believes that one of the most

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significant factors contributing to the historic growth of the vacation ownership industry was the entry into the market of some of the world’s major lodging, hospitality and entertainment companies, such as Marriott Vacations Worldwide Corporation, the Walt Disney Company, Hilton Hotels Corporation, Hyatt Corporation, Starwood Hotels and Resorts Worldwide, Inc., and Wyndham Worldwide Corporation. Although vacation ownership operations currently comprise only a portion of some of these companies’ overall operations, Bluegreen believes that their involvement in the vacation ownership industry has enhanced the industry’s image with the general public.

 

The purchase of a timeshare property typically entitles the buyer to use and occupy a fully-furnished residence, generally for a stated period in perpetuity. Typically, the buyer acquires an ownership interest in the vacation residence, which is often held as a tenant-in-common with other buyers of interests in the vacation residence. However, under a points-based vacation club system, such as the Bluegreen Vacation Club, the members purchase a real estate interest in a specific VOI resort, which is deeded on their behalf into a trust and provides the member with beneficial rights, including an annual or biennial allotment of points that can be used to reserve occupancy at participating resorts. See “Products and Services – Vacation Ownership” below for additional information regarding the Bluegreen Vacation Club and Bluegreen’s points-based system.

 

Bluegreen believes that, in general, Americans desire to take family vacations and that the Bluegreen Vacation Club is positioned to benefit from consumer demand for family vacations. However, economic conditions and other factors may have an adverse effect on the demand for vacations as well as on the vacation ownership industry specifically and on Bluegreen’s operations.

 

Products and Services

 

Vacation Ownership

 

Bluegreen Vacations has been involved in the vacation ownership industry since its inception in 1994. Since Bluegreen’s inception, Bluegreen has generated approximately 492,000 VOI sales transactions, which include over 58,000 VOI sales transactions on behalf of third-parties. As of December 31, 2014, Bluegreen was selling VOIs in the Bluegreen Vacation Club at 23 sales offices at resorts located in the United States. VOIs in Bluegreen resorts and those sold by Bluegreen on behalf of third parties typically entitle the buyer to use resort accommodations through an annual or biennial allotment of “points” which represent their ownership and beneficial use rights in perpetuity in the Bluegreen Vacation Club (supported by an underlying deeded VOI held in trust for the buyer). Bluegreen believes the Bluegreen Vacation Club allows its VOI owners to customize their vacation experience in a more flexible manner than traditional fixed-week vacation ownership programs. Members can use their points to stay in resorts for varying lengths of time on vacations for as little as two nights or as many nights as their points will allow on any one vacation. The number of points required for a stay at a resort varies depending on a variety of factors, including the resort location, the size of a unit, the vacation season and the days of the week used. Under this system, members can select vacations among available resorts according to their schedules, space needs, and available points. Subject to certain restrictions and fees, members are typically allowed to carry over for one year any unused points and to "borrow" points from the next year. Bluegreen Vacation Club members may use their points to stay in any of 65 Bluegreen Vacation Club resorts, as described in further detail below. Bluegreen Vacation Club members may also use their points to take advantage of other vacation options, including an exchange program offered by a third-party world-wide vacation ownership exchange network of over 4,500 resorts and other vacation experiences such as cruises and hotel stays. Additionally, through an alliance with Choice Hotels International, Inc. (NYSE:CHH, “Choice Hotels”) Bluegreen Vacation Club members may enroll in Choice Hotels’ free rewards program,  Choice Privileges®. For a fee Bluegreen Vacation Club members can convert their Bluegreen Vacation Club points into Choice Privileges® points, which can be used for free nights at Choice hotel locations and other rewards such as gift cards.  Additionally, for a fee, members of the Bluegreen Traveler Plus™ program may use their Bluegreen Vacation Club points for stays in Choice Hotels’ Ascend Hotel Collection® properties, a network of historic, boutique and unique hotels in the United States, Canada, Scandinavia and Latin America, subject to the terms and conditions of the program.  See “VOI Exchange Networks, the Bluegreen Traveler Plus™ Program and Other Strategic Alliances” for additional information regarding other vacation options available to Bluegreen Vacation Club members.

 

The owners of VOIs collectively manage the resort property through nonprofit property owners’ associations that are in each case governed by a board of directors or trustees, consisting of representatives of the developer (so long as the developer owns VOIs in the resort or as otherwise provided by law) and owners of VOIs at the resort. The board of directors hires a management company to which it delegates many of the rights and responsibilities of the property owners’ association, including grounds landscaping, security, housekeeping and operating supplies, garbage collection, utilities, insurance, laundry and repairs and maintenance.  Each VOI owner is required to pay a share of the costs of maintaining all of the properties in the Bluegreen Vacation Club system. These charges generally consist of an annual maintenance fee plus applicable real estate taxes and special assessments, which are assessed on an as-needed

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basis. If a VOI owner does not pay such charges, the owner’s use rights may be suspended and ultimately terminated, subject to the lender’s first mortgage lien on the VOI, if any.

 

According to information compiled by various sources, Bluegreen believes its typical customer to be married with an average age of 48 and an average household income of approximately $75,000.

 

Capital-Light Business Strategy

 

In addition to Bluegreen’s traditional vacation ownership operations, Bluegreen has in recent years pursued a business strategy, referred to herein as the “capital light” business strategy, involving activities that generally do not require the significant costs and capital investments generally incurred in connection with the acquisition and development of VOIs and Bluegreen’s traditional, or legacy, vacation ownership business.  Bluegreen’s results for the year ended December 31, 2014 reflect Bluegreen’s continued focus on its capital-light business.  Bluegreen believes its capital-light business strategy enables it to leverage its expertise in resort management, sales and marketing, mortgage servicing, title services, and construction management to generate recurring revenues from third parties. Bluegreen’s goal is for its capital-light business activities to become an increasing portion of its business over time; however, these efforts may not be successful.  As of December 31, 2014, Bluegreen’s capital-light business activities consisted of the following: fee-based sales and marketing arrangements; just-in-time inventory acquisition arrangements; secondary market arrangements; and other fee-based services.  Each of these categories is described below.  

 

Fee-Based Sales and Marketing Arrangements

 

In 2009, Bluegreen began offering sales and marketing services to third party developers for a fee. Under these arrangements, Bluegreen sells third party VOIs as Bluegreen Vacation Club interests through its distribution network of sales offices, typically on a non-committed basis. Bluegreen seeks to structure its fee for these services to cover its selling and marketing costs, plus an operating profit. Because the completed VOI was built by a third party, Bluegreen is not at risk for the development financing of these projects and Bluegreen has little to no capital requirements. Notes receivable originated in connection with Bluegreen’s sale of third party VOIs under commission-based arrangements are held by the third party developer, and in certain cases, are serviced by Bluegreen for a fee. Bluegreen refers to sales made on behalf of third-party developers as “FBS Sales”.

 

Just-In-Time Arrangements

 

During the first quarter of 2013, Bluegreen began entering into agreements with third party developers that allow Bluegreen to buy VOI inventory from time to time in close proximity to the timing of when Bluegreen intends to sell such VOIs. Bluegreen strives to enter into such arrangements on a non-committed basis, although Bluegreen may engage in committed arrangements under certain circumstances. Because the completed VOI was built by a third party, Bluegreen is not at risk for the development financing of these projects. Unlike FBS Sales, receivables originated in connection with sales of just-in-time inventory are held by Bluegreen.  Bluegreen refers to sales of inventory acquired through these arrangements as “Just-In-Time Sales”.

 

Secondary Market Arrangements

 

In 2012, Bluegreen began a formal program to acquire VOI inventory from resorts’ property owner associations (“POAs”) and certain other parties on a non-committed basis, in close proximity to the timing of when Bluegreen intends to sell such VOIs. Such VOIs are typically obtained by the POAs through foreclosure in connection with maintenance fee defaults, and are generally acquired by Bluegreen at a significant discount.  Bluegreen refers to sales of inventory acquired through these arrangements as “Secondary Market Sales”.

 

Other Fee-Based Services

 

Bluegreen also earns fees for providing management services to the Bluegreen Vacation Club and to certain POAs. In connection with the management services provided to the Bluegreen Vacation Club, Bluegreen manages the club reservation system and provides owner services as well as billing and collection services. In connection with Bluegreen’s management of POAs, Bluegreen provides day-to-day management services, including oversight of housekeeping services, maintenance and certain accounting and administrative services. As of December 31, 2014, Bluegreen provided management services to 49 timeshare resort properties and hotels.  Other fee-based services also includes the processing of sales of VOIs through

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Bluegreen’s wholly-owned title company, which earns title fees in connection with the closing of the VOI transactions.

 

Bluegreen also generates fee-based income by providing construction design and management services, and mortgage servicing.  

 

During the year ended December 31, 2014:

 

·

Bluegreen generated “free cash flow” (cash flow from operating activities less capital expenditures) of $129.5 million compared to $94.9 million during 2013.   

 

·

Bluegreen earned income from continuing operations of $68.6 million compared to $56.5 million for 2013.

 

·

System-wide sales of VOIs which include sales of Bluegreen inventory, including sales of Legacy inventory and Secondary Market Sales, as well as sales of third-party inventory and Just-In-Time Sales, were $523.8 million compared to $456.6 million during 2013. 

 

·

Bluegreen sold $221.3 million of third-party inventory under FBS Sales arrangements and earned sales and marketing commissions of $144.2 million in connection with those sales.  During 2013, Bluegreen sold $141.1 million of third-party inventory under FBS Sales arrangements and earned sales and marketing commission of $91.9 million in connection with those sales. In addition, Bluegreen sold $35.5 million of inventory under Just-In-Time Sales arrangements during 2014. Including Bluegreen resort management, title services, construction management and other fee-based operations, and based on an allocation of Bluegreen’s selling, marketing and field general and administrative expenses, Bluegreen believes it generated $71.5 million and $56.2 million in pre-tax profits by providing fee-based services during the years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively.

 

·

Further, Bluegreen sold $63.3 million of inventory under Secondary market arrangements during 2014 compared to $41.1 million during 2013.

 

Additionally, Bluegreen has continued to seek cash sales and larger customer down payments on financed sales. During the year ended December 31, 2014, 50% of its VOI sales were realized in cash within approximately 30 days from the contract date. See “Liquidity and Capital Resources” below for additional information.

 

Vacation Club Resort Locations

 

Bluegreen Vacation Club resorts are primarily “drive-to” resort destinations.  Bluegreen believes that most of its VOI owners live within a 300 mile drive of at least one of its resorts.  Units at most of the Bluegreen Vacation Club resorts typically include a full kitchen, two televisions, a DVD player and laundry facilities. Many resorts offer guests a clubhouse (with an indoor or outdoor pool, a game room, exercise facilities and a lounge) and hotel-type staff.  Bluegreen manages certain of the resorts either directly or through a subcontract.

 

The following table lists the Bluegreen Vacation Club resorts:

 

 

 

Bluegreen Vacation Club Resort 

Location

Paradise Isle Resort

Gulf Shores, Alabama

Shoreline Towers Resort

Gulf Shores, Alabama

Cibola Vista Resort and Spa (1)(4)

Peoria, Arizona

La Cabana Beach Resort & Casino (3)

Oranjestad, Aruba

Blue Water Resort at Cable Beach (1)(4)

Cable Beach, Nassau, Bahamas

The Club at Big Bear Village (1)

Big Bear Lake, California

The Innsbruck Aspen (1) (4)     

Aspen, Colorado

Via Roma Beach Resort (1)

Bradenton Beach, Florida 

Daytona SeaBreeze (1)

Daytona Beach Shores, Florida

Dolphin Beach Club (1)

Daytona Beach Shores, Florida

Fantasy Island Resort II (1)

Daytona Beach Shores, Florida

Mariner’s Boathouse and Beach Resort

Fort Myers Beach, Florida

Tropical Sands Resort

Fort Myers Beach, Florida

Windward Passage Resort

Fort Myers Beach, Florida

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Gulfstream Manor (1)

Gulfstream, Florida

Resort Sixty-Six (1)

Holmes Beach, Florida 

The Hammocks at Marathon (1)

Marathon, Florida

The Fountains (1)

Orlando, Florida

Lake Eve Resort (1) (4)

Orlando, Florida

Orlando’s Sunshine Resort I & II (1)

Orlando, Florida

Casa del Mar Beach Resort (1)

Ormond Beach, Florida

Outrigger Beach Club (1)

Ormond Beach, Florida 

Landmark Holiday Beach Resort

Panama City Beach, Florida

Ocean Towers Beach Club

Panama City Beach, Florida

Panama City Resort & Club

Panama City Beach, Florida

Surfrider Beach Club

Sanibel Island, Florida

Grande Villas at World Golf Village &

The Resort at World Golf Village (1)

 

St. Augustine, Florida

Bluegreen at Tradewinds (1) (4)

St. Pete Beach, Florida

Solara Surfside (1)

Surfside, Florida

Petit Crest Villas at Big Canoe

Marble Hill, Georgia

Studio Homes at Ellis Square (1)(4)

Savannah, Georgia 

Bluegreen Club La Pension (1)

New Orleans, Louisiana

Pono Kai Resort

Kauai, Hawaii

The Hotel Blake (1) (4)

Chicago, Illinois

The Breakers Resort (1) (4)

Dennis Port, Massachusetts 

The Soundings Seaside Resort (1) (4)

Dennis Port, Massachusetts 

Mountain Run at Boyne (1)

Boyne Falls, Michigan

The Falls Village (1)

Branson, Missouri

Paradise Point Resort (1)(2)

Hollister, Missouri

Bluegreen Wilderness Club at Big Cedar (1)(2)

Ridgedale, Missouri

The Cliffs at Long Creek (1)(2)

Ridgedale, Missouri

Lake Condominiums at Big Sky

Big Sky, Montana

Bluegreen Club 36 (1)

Las Vegas, Nevada

South Mountain Resort (1)(4)

Lincoln, New Hampshire

Bluegreen at Atlantic Palace

Atlantic City, New Jersey

The Manhattan Club (4)

New York City, New York

Foxrun Townhouses

Lake Lure, North Carolina

Sandcastle Village II

New Bern, North Carolina

Waterwood Townhouses

New Bern, North Carolina

The Suites at Hershey (1)

Hershey, Pennsylvania

The Lodge Alley Inn (1)

Charleston, South Carolina

Players Club

Hilton Head Island, South Carolina

Carolina Grande (1)

Myrtle Beach, South Carolina

Harbour Lights (1)

Myrtle Beach, South Carolina

Horizon at 77th (1) (4)

Myrtle Beach, South Carolina 

SeaGlass Tower (1)

Myrtle Beach, South Carolina

Shore Crest Vacation Villas I & II (1)

North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina

MountainLoft I & II (1)

Gatlinburg, Tennessee

Laurel Crest (1)

Pigeon Forge, Tennessee

Shenandoah Crossing (1)

Gordonsville, Virginia

Bluegreen Wilderness Traveler at Shenandoah (1)

Gordonsville, Virginia

BG Patrick Henry Square (1)

Parkside Williamsburg Resort (1) (4) 

Williamsburg, Virginia

Williamsburg, Virginia 

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Bluegreen Odyssey Dells (1)

Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin

Christmas Mountain Village (1)

Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin

 

tween Bluegreen and

 

 

 

(1)

This resort is managed by Bluegreen Resorts Management, Inc., one of Bluegreen’s wholly-owned subsidiaries.

(2)

This resort is developed, marketed and sold by Bluegreen/Big Cedar Vacations LLC, a joint venture between Bluegreen and Big Cedar, LLC.  Bluegreen owns a 51% interest in this joint venture, and the joint venture’s results of operations, cash flows and financial position are included in Bluegreen’s consolidated financial statements.

(3)

This resort is managed by Casa Grande Cooperative Association I, which has contracted with Bluegreen Resorts Management, Inc. to provide management consulting services to the resort.

(4)   

This resort was developed by third-parties and Bluegreen has sold VOIs on their behalf, or on a just-in-time basis as part of Bluegreen’s capital-light business strategy.

 

Below is a description of each of the Bluegreen Vacation Club resorts. Certain of the amenities described below for these resorts are separately owned and operated, and may require guests to pay separate fees.

 

Paradise Isle Resort — Gulf Shores, Alabama. This resort is located in Gulf Shores, across the street from the beach and the Gulf of Mexico. Amenities include private oceanfront balconies, an outdoor swimming pool, a children’s pool and a barbeque grill area.

 

Shoreline Towers — Gulf Shores, Alabama. Shoreline Towers is located on the beach in Gulf Shores, overlooking the Gulf of Mexico. This beachfront resort features two- and three-bedroom suites and offers amenities such as a pool, private balconies, biking and nearby tennis facilities.

 

Cibola Vista Resort and Spa — Peoria, Arizona. Located between Lake Pleasant and Phoenix, this resort offers two outdoor pools and water slides, workout facilities, studios, and one- and two- bedroom suites with kitchens, fireplaces, and Western decor.

 

La Cabana Beach & Racquet Club — Oranjestad, Aruba. La Cabana Beach & Racquet Club is a 449-suite oceanfront resort that offers one-, two-, and three-bedroom suites, garden suites and penthouse accommodations. On-site amenities include racquetball, squash, two swimming pools and private beach cabanas.

 

Blue Water Resort at Cable Beach — Cable Beach, Nassau, Bahamas. This oceanfront resort, located on the white sands of Cable Beach in the Nassau suburbs, offers three-bedroom suites and an outdoor pool.

 

The Club at Big Bear Village – Big Bear Lake, California. This 18-unit resort is located in the mountains of Southern California in Big Bear Lake. This resort features three- and four bedroom villas and offers amenities such as a heated pool, private fitness center, private balconies, barbeque grill area, and billiards room.

 

The Innsbruck Aspen – Aspen, Colorado. This 17-unit resort is situated within walking distance of downtown Aspen and the mountain slopes, This resort features one and two bedroom villas and offers amenities such as a heated pool, lounge area, private fitness center, barbeque grill area, valet ski service, on site concierge services and a local shuttle service.

 

Via Roma Beach Resort — Bradenton Beach, Florida. Featuring one- and two-bedroom suites, this beachfront resort offers such amenities as a heated outdoor swimming pool, hot tub and barbecue grill area.

 

Daytona SeaBreeze — Daytona Beach Shores, Florida. This 80-unit, oceanfront resort is located on Daytona Beach, which is known as the “World’s Most Famous Beach.” Amenities include private ocean-front balconies, a heated outdoor swimming pool, a children’s pool, a hot tub, a fitness center, a barbeque grill area and a game room. The resort is located near the world-famous Daytona International Speedway and DAYTONA USA®.

 

Dolphin Beach Club — Daytona Beach Shores, Florida. The Dolphin Beach Club is located in Daytona Beach overlooking the beach and the Atlantic Ocean. This resort features contemporary white furnishings, a tropical décor, private beachfront balconies and a heated outdoor swimming pool. Guests can enjoy numerous nearby golf courses or visit Daytona International Speedway.

 

Fantasy Island Resort II — Daytona Beach Shores, Florida. This resort is situated on Daytona Beach and features units either facing or with views of the ocean. Amenities include an outdoor heated swimming pool, hot tub and two dry saunas.

 

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Mariner’s Boathouse & Beach Resort — Fort Myers Beach, Florida. Mariner’s Boathouse & Beach Resort is located on the seven-mile long island of Fort Myers Beach, alongside the beaches of the Gulf of Mexico. The beachfront villas are uniquely designed to resemble a yacht, and each features a private, screened-in balcony or porch.

 

Tropical Sands Resort — Fort Myers Beach, Florida. Located on Fort Myers Beach, the Tropical Sands Resort is centered around a sun deck and palm-filled courtyard. Resort amenities include an outdoor heated pool, concierge and a barbecue grill area.

 

Windward Passage Resort — Fort Myers Beach, Florida. This resort is located in the heart of Fort Myers Beach. Just steps away from the beach, the resort features one- and two-bedroom suites and an outdoor heated swimming pool, hot tub, tennis, basketball, volleyball, an on-site playground and a poolside bar.

 

Gulfstream Manor — Gulfstream, Florida. The Gulfstream Manor is located just south of Palm Beach, near shops, galleries, fine dining and boutiques. The beachfront resort features views of the ocean or courtyard and offers an intimate, small resort experience.

 

Resort Sixty-Six — Holmes Beach, Florida. The resort is located on Anna Maria Island which overlooks the Gulf of Mexico. The units at Resort Sixty-Six either overlook the courtyard, or offer views of the Gulf. Resort amenities include an outdoor heated swimming pool, hot tub and a barbecue grill area.

 

The Hammocks at Marathon — Marathon, Florida. The Hammocks at Marathon is located in the Florida Keys within driving distance of both Miami and Key West, Florida. This 58-unit waterfront resort offers such amenities as a pool, boat slips, an outdoor tiki bar and a variety of water sport recreational vehicle rentals.

 

The Fountains — Orlando, Florida. This 54-acre, 569-unit resort is located on a lake and is minutes away from Central Florida’s family attractions, including Walt Disney World®, SeaWorld® and Universal Studios Florida®. Amenities include a clubhouse with a heated indoor/outdoor swimming pool, a pool bar, a massage room, steam and sauna rooms, a family activity room, a tennis court, a basketball court, and a resort style pool facility, as well as an on-site Domino’s Pizza® and a Benihana restaurant.

 

Lake Eve Resort – Orlando, Florida.    This 176-unit resort is located next to The Fountains and on Lake Eve.  This resort features one, two and three bedroom suites and is minutes away from many Orlando attractions.

 

Orlando’s Sunshine Resort I & II — Orlando, Florida. Orlando’s Sunshine Resort is located near Wet’n’Wild® water park and Universal Studios Florida®. This 90-unit property features an outdoor swimming pool, a hot tub and tennis courts.

 

Casa del Mar Beach Resort —  Ormond Beach, Florida. Casa del Mar is a 119-unit, oceanfront resort which includes an outdoor pool and miniature golf. In nearby Daytona Beach, guests can drive on the beach or visit the Daytona International Speedway.

 

Outrigger Beach Club — Ormond Beach, Florida. Steps away from the beach and minutes from Daytona Beach, the Outrigger Beach Club’s shape allows all of the resort’s units to face the Atlantic Ocean. The resort features an outdoor heated swimming pool, children’s swimming pool, poolside grills and hot tub overlooking the beach and ocean.

 

Landmark Holiday Beach Resort — Panama City Beach, Florida. The Landmark Holiday Beach Resort is located on Panama City Beach. The resort features a hot tub, sauna, an indoor heated pool, barbecue grill and oceanfront private balconies.

 

Ocean Towers Beach Club — Panama City Beach, Florida. Located on the “Miracle Strip” in Panama City Beach, Ocean Towers Beach Club offers one- and two-bedroom oceanfront suites. The resort’s units feature private balconies or porches, full kitchens and washer/dryers. Other amenities include an exercise room and outdoor heated pool, and tennis and golf facilities are available nearby.

 

Panama City Resort & Club — Panama City Beach, Florida. The Panama City Resort & Club is located on Panama City Beach overlooking the Gulf of Mexico. Amenities include private balconies, an outdoor heated pool, a hot tub, and nearby jet skiing, windsurfing, parasailing, and golf.

 

Surfrider Beach Club — Sanibel Island, Florida. This resort is located along the beach on Sanibel Island. The resort features one- and two-bedroom suites and amenities such as an outdoor heated swimming pool, hot tub, tennis, fishing and biking.

 

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Grande Villas at World Golf Village & The Resort at World Golf Village — St. Augustine, Florida. Grande Villas is located next to the World Golf Hall of Fame®. This resort features an extensive array of amenities, including golf courses, swimming pools, a hot tub, a sauna and a playground. The resort includes 178 units.

 

Bluegreen at Tradewinds – St. Pete Beach, Florida. This resort is located in St. Pete Beach with easy access to St. Petersburg’s shoreline along the Gulf of Mexico. The resort features studio and one-bedroom villas. Amenities include a spa, fitness center, pool, tennis and nearby paddle boarding, water parks, and casual dining at beach bars.

 

Solara Surfside —  Surfside, Florida. This 62-unit, oceanfront resort is located in Surfside, Florida, near Miami Beach. Solara Surfside captures the art deco style of its surrounding area and features one- and two-bedroom vacation units, a swimming pool, a sun deck and a hot tub.

 

Petit Crest & Golf Club Villas at Big Canoe — Marble Hill, Georgia. The resort is located at Big Canoe in the foothills of the North Georgia Appalachians and an hour north of Atlanta with nearby activities such as fishing, boating, golfing and tennis. Petit Crest Villas’ units feature a balcony or porch, full kitchen, fireplace, washer and dryer.

 

The Studio Homes at Ellis Square — Savannah, Georgia. This resort is centrally located in historic downtown Savannah. Accommodations include one- and two-bedroom suites with fully-equipped designer kitchens.

 

Bluegreen Club La Pension —  New Orleans, Louisiana. This 63-unit resort is located in the French Quarter, just a few blocks from the Mississippi River. Many of the units feature balconies overlooking the French Quarter. The rooftop offers two sundecks with hot tubs and views of the French Quarter, river, and city.

 

Pono Kai Resort — Kapaa (Kauai), Hawaii. This 13-acre oceanfront resort is located on Kauai’s Coconut Coast. Surrounded by palms and the Pacific, the Pono Kai Resort is close to the beaches and features tennis courts, local arts and crafts vendors, concierge and a hospitality suite.

 

The Hotel Blake – Chicago, Illinois. Situated in downtown Chicago’s urban Printer’s Row district, this 162-unit property offers a relaxing retreat and easy access to the activities in the city.

 

The Breakers Resort — Dennis Port, Massachusetts. This resort is located on the beautiful sandy beaches of Nantucket Sound in Cape Cod. This resort offers studio, one- and two-bedroom units and an outdoor heated pool.

 

The Soundings Seaside Resort — Dennis Port, Massachusetts. This resort is centrally located on Nantucket Sound in Cape Cod. This resort has studio, one- and two-bedroom units. Many of the rooms offer views of the Nantucket Sound. The property offers a variety of amenities from the oceanfront outdoor pool and heated indoor pool to an outdoor putting green and a private beach.

 

Mountain Run at Boyne —  Boyne Falls, Michigan. Mountain Run at Boyne is located on Boyne Mountain, which is known for skiing, snowboarding and tubing on more than 50 runs with convenient lift and trail systems. In the summer, Boyne Mountain offers golf on nearby world-class courses designed by some of the game’s masters, including Robert Trent Jones, Arthur Hills, Donald Ross and others. Mountain Run has 104 units.

 

The Falls Village™ — Branson, Missouri. The Falls Village is located near the Ozark Mountains. Fishing, boating and swimming are available at nearby Table Rock Lake and Lake Taneycomo, and area theaters feature shows by renowned country music stars. The Falls Village has 164 units.

 

Paradise Point Resort — Hollister, Missouri. Paradise Point, which currently has 90 units, is situated on Table Rock Lake. This vacation ownership resort is being developed, marketed and sold by Bluegreen/Big Cedar Vacations, LLC (“Bluegreen/Big Cedar Vacations”), a joint venture in which Bluegreen owns a 51% interest, Paradise Point offers studio units, executive 1-bedroom villas and spacious 2-bedroom villas. On-site amenities include a fitness center and an outdoor swimming pool.

 

Bluegreen Wilderness Club at Big Cedar — Ridgedale, Missouri. The Bluegreen Wilderness Club at Big Cedar is a wilderness-themed resort adjacent to the world famous Big Cedar Lodge luxury hotel resort. This vacation ownership resort is also developed, marketed and sold by Bluegreen/Big Cedar Vacations. The 427-unit resort is located on Table Rock Lake, and is near Dogwood Canyon. Guests staying in the two-bedroom cabins or one- or two-bedroom lodge villas enjoy fireplaces, private balconies and full kitchens. Amenities include indoor and outdoor swimming pools and hot tubs, a lazy river, hiking trails, a campfire area, and playground. Guests also have access to certain of the luxury amenities at the Big Cedar Lodge, including a marina, horseback riding, tennis courts and a spa.

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The Cliffs at Long Creek — Ridgedale, Missouri. The Cliffs at Long Creek currently features 29 patio homes that overlook Table Rock Lake. These two- level, five-bedroom homes feature two master bedrooms, a whirlpool bath, walk-in closet, media room, billiards table, gourmet kitchen, covered porch, and 2-car garage. This resort is also developed, marketed and sold by Bluegreen/Big Cedar Vacations.

 

Lake Condominiums at Big Sky — Big Sky, Montana. Lake Condominiums at Big Sky is located at the foot of Lore Mountain overlooking Lake Levinsky. The resort features amenities such as a heated outdoor swimming pool, two large hot tubs and nearby skiing.

 

BG Club 36 — Las Vegas, Nevada. This 31-story, 478-unit resort is located just off the Las Vegas strip and features various amenities, including an indoor pool, outdoor sundeck, fitness center and on-site restaurants. Bluegreen Club 36 features both one- and two-bedroom villas with Parisian Art Deco décor.

 

South Mountain Resort — Lincoln, New Hampshire. This resort features year-round activities and offers many on-site amenities, and is a short drive to three separate ski mountains, hiking and biking trails, and many shops and restaurants.

 

Bluegreen at Atlantic Palace — Atlantic City, New Jersey. This 31-story resort is situated on the Atlantic Ocean and the Atlantic City Boardwalk and features an outdoor pool, hot tub, game room, exercise room, steam room and sauna. 

 

The Manhattan Club — New York City, New York. This resort is located in the heart of New York City and is in close proximity to some of the city’s finest attractions, bars, restaurants, nightclubs and theaters. Suites feature high-end furnishings, kitchenettes, and marble baths as well as flat screen TVs, Bose® radios and Wi-Fi Internet access.

 

Foxrun Townhouses — Lake Lure, North Carolina. Located on Lake Lure at the foot of the Blue Ridge Mountains, Foxrun Townhouses offers two-bedroom units with activities, including golf, fishing, skiing in the winter and water sports in the spring, summer and fall.

 

Sandcastle Village II — New Bern, North Carolina. New Bern is located at the intersection of the Trent and Neuse Rivers. Guests can enjoy nearby sailing, boating and water sports, as well as the antique shops in the historic downtown area. The unique and spacious pedestal-style townhomes feature full kitchens, washers and dryers, and fireplaces.

 

Waterwood Townhouses — New Bern, North Carolina. Secluded in a remote area near historical Tyron Palace, the Waterwood Townhouses resort attracts sports, outdoor and nature enthusiasts. This lakefront resort offers two-bedroom suites and an on-site marina, tennis courts, miniature golf and indoor and outdoor pools.

 

The Suites at Hershey — Hershey, Pennsylvania. This 78-unit resort is located near HersheyPark® and Hershey’s® Chocolate World. Amenities include an outdoor swimming pool, a hot tub, a playground, a picnic area with barbeque grills, a game room, a fitness center and indoor basketball courts.

 

The Lodge Alley Inn™  — Charleston, South Carolina. Located in Charleston’s historic district, The Lodge Alley Inn includes one- and two-bedroom suites, many furnished with an equipped kitchen, a living room with a fireplace, a dining room, a whirlpool bath, pine wood floors and 18th century-style furniture reproductions. This 90-unit resort, which features an on-site restaurant, is within walking distance of many of Charleston’s historical sites, open-air markets and art galleries.

 

Players Club — Hilton Head Island, South Carolina. Players Club is located on Hilton Head Island, which is famous for its striking natural beauty, expansive beaches and world-class golf and tennis. This resort features 28 lighted tennis courts and a health club.

 

Carolina Grande — Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. This 118-unit 20-story tower is located across the street from the beach. Through an arrangement with The Carolinian Beach Resort, guests enjoy an accessible breezeway directly to the beach. Other amenities include indoor and outdoor swimming pools, hot tubs, full kitchens, washers and dryers, and views of the ocean and city. The resort is located near NASCAR® SpeedPark, Broadway at the BeachTM (a 350-acre complex featuring numerous specialty shops, restaurants, attractions and nightclubs), Myrtle Waves Water Park, Carolina Opry, Dixie Stampede and the Myrtle Beach Convention Center.

 

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Harbour Lights — Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. Harbour Lights is a 228-unit resort located in the Fantasy Harbour Complex in the center of Myrtle Beach. Nearby are Theater Row, shopping, golf courses and restaurants. The resort’s activities center overlooks the Intracoastal Waterway.

 

Horizon at 77th – Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. The Horizon at 77th resort is a beach retreat with spacious one-, two- and three-bedroom villas featuring full kitchens with granite countertops and stainless steel appliances. Guests at this resort can enjoy a spa, and lazy river, or go for a swim in one of the resort’s two pools. 

 

SeaGlass Tower — Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. The SeaGlass Tower is a 19-story, 144-unit mirrored tower located on the beach. Amenities include, among others, balconies, fully equipped kitchens, whirlpool baths, an indoor and two outdoor swimming pools, a hot tub, and two saunas. SeaGlass Tower is located near Broadway at the Beach and the Myrtle Beach Convention Center.

 

Shore Crest Vacation Villas I & II — North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. Shore Crest Vacation Villas consists of two towers and 240 units and is located on the beach in the Windy Hill section of North Myrtle Beach, a mile from Barefoot Landing, which features numerous restaurants, theaters, shops and outlet stores.

 

MountainLoft I & II — Gatlinburg, Tennessee. MountainLoft is located near the Great Smoky Mountains National Park and is minutes from the family attractions of Pigeon Forge, Tennessee. The 284 units are located in individual chalets or mid-rise villa buildings. Each unit has private balconies.

 

Laurel Crest — Pigeon Forge, Tennessee. Laurel Crest is located in close proximity to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park and the Dollywood theme park. In addition, visitors to Pigeon Forge can enjoy over 200 factory outlet stores and music shows featuring renowned country music stars as well as partake in a variety of outdoor activities, such as horseback riding, trout fishing, boating, golfing and white water rafting. Laurel Crest has 296 units.

 

Shenandoah Crossing — Gordonsville, Virginia. Shenandoah Crossing, which currently includes 264 units, features an 18-hole golf course, indoor and outdoor swimming pools, tennis courts, horseback riding trails and a lake for fishing and boating.

 

Bluegreen Wilderness Traveler at Shenandoah — Gordonsville, Virginia. This property is located adjacent to Bluegreen’s Shenandoah Crossing resort. Wilderness Traveler at Shenandoah provides Bluegreen Vacation Club members with a high quality vacation experience in the “great outdoors”. Accommodations consist of 122 cabins, luxury campsites for recreational vehicles and fully furnished climate-controlled platform tents, as well as outdoor-themed amenities and programs.

 

BG Patrick Henry Square – Williamsburg, Virginia. This 66-unit resort is located only 1/2 a block from Colonial Williamsburg. The resort has accommodations ranging from studio to two-bedroom villas with kitchen and colonial-inspired décor. Nearby attractions include Busch Gardens® Williamsburg and Water Country USA®, as well as the nearby scenic Atlantic beaches, shopping, golf, and water attractions.

 

Parkside Williamsburg Resort — Williamsburg, Virginia. This resort is located only blocks away from Colonial Williamsburg. The resort has accommodations ranging from studio to two-bedroom villas with kitchens and colonial-inspired décor. Nearby attractions include Busch Gardens® Williamsburg and Water Country USA®, as well as the nearby scenic Atlantic beaches, shopping, golf, and water attractions.

 

Bluegreen Odyssey Dells — Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin. This seven acre 92-unit resort is located adjacent to the 156-acre Mt. Olympus Resort Water and Theme Park.

 

Christmas Mountain Village — Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin. Christmas Mountain Village is a 387-unit resort offering a 27-hole golf course and seven ski trails served by two chair lifts. Other on-site amenities include tennis courts, a five-acre lake with paddleboats and rowboats and four outdoor swimming pools.

 

Future Resorts and Acquisition of Additional Inventory

 

Bluegreen believes that it currently has adequate timeshare inventory on hand, or available for sale through arrangements with third parties in connection with its capital-light business strategy, to satisfy its projected sales of VOIs for 2015, and a number of years thereafter. Accordingly, Bluegreen currently does not plan to acquire or significantly develop additional resort properties in the near term other than those to be developed by Bluegreen/Big

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Cedar Vacations and resorts added to the Bluegreen Vacation Club pursuant to Bluegreen’s capital-light business strategy.  However, Bluegreen may decide to acquire or develop inventory in the future.

 

VOI Exchange Networks, the Bluegreen Traveler Plus™ Program, and Other Strategic Alliances

 

Bluegreen believes that its VOIs are made more attractive by its alliance with Choice Hotels, third-party exchange networks, its Traveler Plus™ program and other strategic affiliations with third-party resort developers. In January 2013, Bluegreen entered into a five-year strategic alliance agreement with Choice Hotels. Choice Hotels currently franchises approximately 6,300 hotels in more than 35 countries and territories and its brands include the Ascend Hotel Collection®, Comfort Inn®, Comfort Suites®, Quality®, Sleep Inn®, Clarion®, Cambria® hotels and suites, MainStay Suites®, Suburban Extended Stay Hotel®, Econo Lodge® and Rodeway Inn®. Bluegreen’s relationship with Choice Hotels impacts several areas of Bluegreen’s business and, while there is no assurance as to the success of the relationship, it includes a sales and marketing alliance component that Bluegreen believes will enable it to leverage Choice Hotels brands, customer relationships and marketing channels to market Bluegreen’s VOI offerings. Additionally, subject to the terms and conditions of the agreements, including specified payments to be made to Choice Hotels, as of December 31, 2014 a total of 24 Bluegreen Vacation Club resorts have been branded as part of the Ascend Hotel Collection®. Also, Bluegreen Vacation Club members may enroll as members of the Choice Hotels loyalty program, Choice Privileges® and, for a fee can convert their Bluegreen Vacation Club points into Choice Privileges® points which can be used for stays at participating Choice Hotels. Additionally, for a fee, members of the Bluegreen Traveler Plus™ program may use their vacation points for stays at Choice Hotels’ Ascend Hotel Collection® properties subject to the terms and conditions of the program.

 

Bluegreen Vacation Club members may also participate in an unaffiliated external exchange network, Resort Condominiums International, LLC (“RCI”). The RCI exchange network allows an owner to exchange stays in their VOI for occupancy at over 4,500 participating resorts located throughout the world in over 100 countries, based upon availability and the payment of a variable exchange fee. The annual membership fees of RCI are included in the Bluegreen Vacation Club dues. In 2014, approximately 8% of Bluegreen owners utilized the RCI exchange network for an exchange of two or more nights. Most of the Bluegreen Vacation Club resorts are rated in one of the two highest categories by RCI (Gold Crown and Silver Crown).  

 

Bluegreen Vacation Club members, for an additional annual fee, may also participate in the Bluegreen Traveler Plus™ program, which allows them to use their points for a variety of hotel stays, RV site stays within the “Coast to Coast” network, or various cruise vacations. Also, for a nominal fee, Bluegreen Vacation Club owners who purchased or upgraded their VOI since July 1, 2007 and participate in the Bluegreen Traveler Plus™ program, have the ability to use their vacation points to reserve accommodations in 43 additional resort locations through our alliances with other resort development companies (“Direct Exchange”).

 

No assurance can be given that Bluegreen’s resorts will continue to participate in the RCI or Direct Exchange networks, or that Bluegreen’s customers will continue to be satisfied with these networks or the Bluegreen Traveler Plus™ program.  In addition, Bluegreen’s relationship with Choice Hotels may not be received favorably by Bluegreen’s customers and may not have a positive impact on Bluegreen’s operating results or financial condition. Bluegreen’s failure or the failure of any of Bluegreen’s resorts to participate in qualified exchange networks or other strategic alliances, or the failure of such networks or other strategic alliances to operate effectively could have a material adverse effect on Bluegreen. 

 

Marketing and Sale of Inventory

 

Bluegreen uses a variety of methods to attract prospective purchasers of VOIs, including selling discount vacation packages either face-to-face or through telemarketing efforts to consumers Bluegreen meets in connection with various marketing alliances (as discussed in greater detail below), acquiring the right to market to prospective purchasers from third-party vendors, and referrals of prospective purchasers from existing VOI owners. Bluegreen sometimes provides hotel accommodations or accommodations in one of Bluegreen’s resorts to prospective purchasers at reduced rates in exchange for their touring one of Bluegreen’s resorts.

 

Additionally,  Bluegreen offers a sampler program, which allows purchasers of this product to enjoy substantially the same accommodations offered to Bluegreen Vacation Club members during a trial period, which is generally one or two years.  Bluegreen believes that it benefits from the sampler program as it gives Bluegreen an opportunity to market its VOIs to customers when they use their trial memberships at a Bluegreen resort and to recapture a portion of the costs incurred in connection with the initial marketing to prospective customers.

 

In addition to attracting new customers, Bluegreen seeks to sell VOIs to its existing VOI owners (“owner sales”). Owner sales generally have lower marketing costs and typically result in relatively higher operating margins than sales

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generated through other marketing channels. During 2014, owner sales accounted for 56.1% of Bluegreen’s system-wide sales. However, Bluegreen has recently increased, and expects to continue to increase, its marketing efforts to new customers as compared to existing owners as it believes that its ability to continue to sell VOIs to its current existing owner base will diminish over time.  Accordingly, Bluegreen expects that its owner sales as a percentage of total sales will decrease in the future, and Bluegreen’s marketing expenses will increase as sales to new customers involve higher costs than sales to existing owners. 

 

Bluegreen uses both “permission” marketing and branding programs. “Permission” marketing methods involve obtaining the prospective purchasers’ permission, directly or indirectly, to contact them in the future regarding an offer to purchase a product or service. Branding involves forming alliances with third-party entities that possess what Bluegreen believes to be a nationally or regionally known brand name, a good reputation and a customer base with similar demographic characteristics to Bluegreen’s target market.

 

One of Bluegreen’s wholly-owned subsidiaries has an arrangement with Big Cedar, LLC (“Big Cedar”), an affiliate of Bass Pro, Inc. (“Bass Pro”), relating to Bluegreen/Big Cedar Vacations. Bluegreen’s subsidiary owns 51% of Bluegreen/Big Cedar Vacations and Big Cedar owns the remaining 49%. Bluegreen/Big Cedar Vacations develops, markets, and sells VOIs at the Bluegreen Wilderness Club at Big Cedar, a wilderness-themed resort adjacent to the Big Cedar Lodge, a luxury hotel resort owned by Big Cedar, on the shores of Table Rock Lake in Ridgedale, Missouri. Bluegreen/Big Cedar Vacations also develops, markets, and sells timeshare interests in The Cliffs at Long Creek and Paradise Point Resort. Bluegreen/Big Cedar Vacations pays Big Cedar a fee upon sales of certain timeshare interests for promotional, marketing and advertising services.

 

Bluegreen also has an exclusive marketing agreement with Bass Pro a privately-held retailer of fishing, marine, hunting, camping and sports gear. Pursuant to the agreement, Bluegreen has the right to market VOIs at each of Bass Pro’s retail locations.  As of December 31, 2014, Bluegreen marketed VOIs in 61 of Bass Pro’s stores.  Under the agreement, Bluegreen also has the right to market VOIs in Bass Pro’s catalogs and on its website, and Bluegreen has access to Bass Pro’s customer lists. In exchange, Bluegreen compensates Bass Pro based on the overall success of these marketing activities. The amount of compensation is dependent on the level of additional marketing efforts required by Bluegreen to convert the prospect into a sale and a defined time frame for such marketing efforts. No compensation is paid to Bass Pro under the marketing agreement on sales made by Bluegreen/Big Cedar Vacations of VOIs owned by Bluegreen/Big Cedar Vacations. In accordance with the agreement, Bluegreen makes an annual prepayment to Big Cedar by January of each year. The prepayment is an advance payment for anticipated commissions estimated to be generated during the upcoming year, as determined by Bluegreen and Big Cedar, not to exceed $5.0 million. No additional commissions are paid to Big Cedar during any year until the annual prepayment for that year has been fully earned. During 2014, sales of VOIs to prospects and leads generated by the marketing arrangement with Bass Pro accounted for over 20% of Bluegreen’s VOI sales volume.  Bluegreen’s marketing agreement with Bass Pro is for a term expiring in January 2025, subject to early termination in whole or in part under certain circumstances.  There is no assurance that Bluegreen will be able to maintain, extend or renew its marketing relationship with Bass Pro, including for the duration of the term of the agreement, and Bluegreen’s sales would be materially and adversely impacted if Bluegreen’s relationship with Bass Pro ended.

 

As previously described, Bluegreen entered into a five-year strategic relationship with Choice Hotels in January 2013. This relationship impacts several areas of Bluegreen’s business and, while there is no assurance as to the success of the relationship, it includes a sales and marketing alliance component which Bluegreen believes will enable Bluegreen to leverage Choice Hotels brands, customer relationships and marketing channels to market Bluegreen’s VOI offerings.  Choice Hotels’ obligations under the agreements are subject to Bluegreen making specified payments to Choice Hotels and certain other terms and conditions.

 

Typically, Bluegreen’s sales offices are located adjacent to certain of its resorts and are staffed with sales representatives and sales managers, all of whom are Bluegreen employees. Bluegreen sponsors ongoing training for its personnel.

 

It is Bluegreen’s policy to require its sales staff to provide each VOI customer with a written disclosure statement prior to the time the customer signs a purchase agreement. The purpose of this disclosure statement is to provide relevant information regarding VOI ownership at the resort and membership in the Bluegreen Vacation Club. Pursuant to Bluegreen policies, the statement must be signed by every purchaser. Purchasers are entitled to cancel purchase agreements within applicable legal rescission periods. Substantially all VOI purchasers visit one of Bluegreen’s sales offices prior to or at the time of purchase.

 

 

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Customer Financing

 

Bluegreen offers financing of up to 90% of the purchase price of its VOIs to its VOI customers who meet certain FICO® score-based underwriting standards. The typical financing extended by Bluegreen on a VOI during 2014 provided for a term of 10 years and a fixed interest rate. However, Bluegreen also encourages purchasers to finance their purchase with a loan having a shorter term by offering a lower interest rate on those loans. In connection with Bluegreen VOI sales, Bluegreen delivers the property deed to the trustee of the Bluegreen Vacation Club on behalf of the purchaser and obtains a mortgage on the purchaser’s VOI.

 

Purchasers of VOIs are required to make a down payment of at least 10% of the VOI sales price. As part of Bluegreen’s continued efforts to improve its operating cash flows, starting in 2009 Bluegreen began incentivizing its sales associates to encourage cash sales, and Bluegreen began promoting a point-of-sale credit card program sponsored by third party financial institutions.  As a result, Bluegreen has increased both the percentage of its sales that are 100% cash and its average down payment on financed sales. Including down payments received on financed sales, approximately 50% of Bluegreen VOI sales during 2014 were paid in cash within approximately 30 days from the contract date.

 

See “Products and Services — Vacation Ownership” above for more information about the demographic profile of Bluegreen’s typical customer. See “Sales of Receivables/Pledging of Receivables” below for information regarding Bluegreen’s receivable financing activities.

 

Loan Underwriting

 

Prior to December 15, 2008, Bluegreen’s VOI financing was not subject to any significant loan underwriting criteria and no FICO® score was obtained prior to extending credit. Instead, customer financing on sales of VOIs typically only required the following: (i) receipt of a minimum down payment of 10% of the purchase price; (ii) a note and mortgage (or deed of trust); and (iii) other closing documents by the purchaser and Bluegreen.

 

Effective December 15, 2008, Bluegreen implemented a FICO® score-based credit underwriting program. Following implementation,  Bluegreen no longer provided financing to customers with FICO® scores below 500, and new customers with FICO® scores between 500 and 599 were required to make a minimum cash down payment of 20%. Effective January 1, 2010, Bluegreen further increased its FICO® score-based credit underwriting standards such that Bluegreen no longer originates financing to customers with FICO® scores below 575. Bluegreen may, from time to time, offer certain introductory products to customers with different FICO®  scores, finance and down payment terms that it intends to hold in its portfolio.  Additionally, Bluegreen may provide financing to customers with no FICO®  scores who make a minimum required down payment.  For loans with an outstanding balance as of December 31, 2014 that were originated from December 15, 2008 through December 31, 2009, the borrowers’ weighted average FICO® score at the point of sale was 702.  For loans with an outstanding balance as of December 31, 2014 that were originated from January 1, 2010 through December 31, 2014, the borrowers’ weighted average FICO® score at the point of sale was 707. Further information is set forth in the following table:

Picture 3

 

 

 

(1)

Excludes loans originated after December 15, 2008 for which the obligor did not have a FICO® score

 

Bluegreen encourages purchasers to make higher down payments and accept shorter loan period terms by offering lower interest rates.  In addition, where permitted under applicable laws, rules and regulations, buyers receive a 1% discount in the interest rate by participating in Bluegreen’s pre-authorized checking payment plan.  As of December 31, 2014, borrowers with respect to approximately 91% of Bluegreen’s serviced VOI notes receivable participated in Bluegreen’s pre-authorized checking payment plan. 

 

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Effective November 1, 2008, Bluegreen increased the interest rates charged on new loans. Bluegreen believes that the weighted-average interest rate on its portfolio will increase over time, as the lower-interest rate older loans continue to be reduced as a percentage of Bluegreen’s outstanding portfolio.  The weighted-average interest rate on Bluegreen’s VOI notes receivable was as follows:

 

Picture 4

 

Collection Policies

 

Financed sales of VOIs originated by Bluegreen typically utilize a note and mortgage. Collection efforts related to the timeshare loans are managed by Bluegreen and are handled by a staff of experienced collectors, assisted by a mortgage collection computer system. Bluegreen’s collectors are incentivized through a performance-based compensation program. Technological capabilities include, but are not limited to, automated lock box and clearing house processing.

 

Bluegreen generally makes collection efforts to customers by mail and by telephone. Telephone contact generally commences when an account is as few as 10 days past due. At 30 days past due, a collection letter is sent to U.S. residents advising the customer that if the loan is not brought current, the delinquency will be reported to the credit reporting agencies. At 60 days delinquent, Bluegreen sends a lockout letter to the customer by mail advising that they cannot make any future reservations for lodging at a resort. If the delinquency continues, at 90 days past due, Bluegreen stops the accrual of, and reverses previously accrued but unpaid, interest on the note receivable and mails a “Notice of Intent to Cancel Membership,” which informs the customer that unless the delinquency is cured within 30 days,  Bluegreen will terminate the customer’s VOI ownership. If the customer fails to respond to such correspondence within the given timeframe, the loan will be defaulted and the customer’s VOI terminated. In that case, Bluegreen sends a final letter, typically at approximately 120 day delinquent, to notify the customer of the loan default and the termination of the customer’s beneficial interest in the timeshare property. Thereafter, Bluegreen seeks to resell the VOI to a new purchaser. Historically, Bluegreen has typically not sought to collect a deficiency on defaulted notes.

 

Allowance for Credit Losses

 

Under timeshare accounting rules, Bluegreen estimates uncollectibles based on historical uncollectibles for similar VOI notes receivable and does not consider the value of the underlying collateral.  Bluegreen holds large amounts of homogeneous VOI notes receivable and assesses uncollectibility based on pools of receivables. In estimating future credit losses, Bluegreen does not use a single primary indicator of credit quality but instead evaluates its VOI notes based upon a combination of factors, including a static pool analysis, the aging of the respective receivables, current default trends and prepayment rates by origination year, as well as the FICO® scores of the borrowers.

 

Substantially all defaulted VOI notes receivable result in the holder of the note receivable acquiring the related VOI that secured the note receivable, typically soon after default and at little or no cost. The reacquired VOI is then available for resale in the normal course of business.

 

See “Item 7 – Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” for additional information about the performance of Bluegreen’s notes receivable portfolio.

 

Sales of Receivables/Pledging of Receivables

 

Bluegreen’s ability to sell or borrow against its VOI notes receivable has historically been a critical factor in Bluegreen meeting its liquidity requirements. The vacation ownership business generally involves making sales of a vacation product where a buyer is only required to pay a minimum of 10% to 20% of the purchase price up front, while at the same time selling and marketing expenses are primarily cash expenses. For the year ended December 31, 2014, Bluegreen’s sales and marketing expenses were approximately 48% of its system-wide sales. Accordingly, having facilities for the sale or hypothecation of these VOI notes receivables, along with periodic term securitization transactions, has been a critical factor for Bluegreen in meeting its short- and long-term cash needs.

 

Bluegreen’s VOI receivables purchase facilities and term securitizations typically utilize an owner’s trust structure whereby Bluegreen sells receivables to a wholly-owned, special purpose finance entity which then sells the receivables

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to an owner’s trust, typically without recourse to Bluegreen or its subsidiaries, except for breaches of certain representations and warranties at the time of sale. While in limited instances, Bluegreen has entered into guarantees in connection with its vacation ownership receivables purchase facilities or term securitizations, historically, Bluegreen has typically not entered into such guarantees. These facilities usually have detailed requirements with respect to the eligibility of receivables for purchase, and fundings under these facilities are typically subject to certain conditions precedent. Under such purchase facilities, a variable purchase price of a portion of the principal balance of the receivables sold, subject to certain terms and conditions, is paid at closing in cash. The balance of the purchase price is deferred until such time as the purchaser of the VOI receivables has received a specified return and all servicing, custodial, agent and similar fees and expenses have been paid and, if applicable, a specified overcollateralization ratio is achieved and a cash reserve account is fully funded. Bluegreen’s VOI receivables purchase facilities typically include various conditions to purchase, covenants, trigger events and other provisions Bluegreen believes to be customary for these types of transactions.  Bluegreen has historically acted as servicer of, and in such capacity received a fee for servicing, the VOI receivables Bluegreen has sold under these purchase facilities. See “Item 7 – Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” for additional information about Bluegreen’s VOI receivables purchase facilities and term securitizations.

 

Receivables Servicing

 

Receivables servicing includes collecting payments from borrowers and remitting the funds to the owners, lenders or investors in such receivables, accounting for principal and interest on such receivables, making advances when required, contacting delinquent borrowers, terminating a membership in the Bluegreen Vacation Club in the event that defaults are not remedied, and performing other administrative duties.

 

Bluegreen receives mortgage servicing fees for servicing its securitized notes receivable which are included as a component of interest income. Additionally, Bluegreen earns servicing fee income from third-party lenders in connection with Bluegreen’s servicing of their loan portfolio under Bluegreen’s fee-based services arrangements. 

 

Market and Industry Data

 

Market and industry data pertaining to Bluegreen and its business contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K were obtained from Bluegreen’s internal surveys, industry publications, unpublished industry data and estimates, discussions with industry sources and other currently available information.  The sources for this data include, without limitation, the American Resort Development Association.  Industry publications generally state that the information contained therein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, but there can be no assurance as to the accuracy and completeness of such information. Bluegreen has not independently verified such market data.  Similarly, Bluegreen’s internal surveys, while believed to be reliable, have not been verified by any independent sources.  Accordingly, such data may not prove to be accurate.

 

 

 

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BBX Capital

 

BFC owns shares of BBX Capital’s Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock representing approximately 51% of the outstanding shares of such stock and 72% of the total voting power of BBX Capital. BBX Capital is a Florida-based company involved in the acquisition, ownership and management of joint ventures and investments in real estate and real estate development projects as well as investments in operating businesses. Prior to the sale of BankAtlantic on July 31, 2012, BBX Capital was a bank holding company and its principal asset was its 100% ownership interest in BankAtlantic, a federal savings bank.  Accordingly, as a result of such sale, the operations of BankAtlantic except for its commercial lending reporting unit are included in discontinued operations in our financial statements for all periods presented. 

 

The principal assets of BBX Capital consist of its interest in Florida Asset Resolution Group, LLC (“FAR”), BBX Capital Asset Management, LLC (“CAM”), BBX Partners, Inc., its investment in Woodbridge, Renin Holdings, LLC, BBX Sweet Holdings, LLC and its acquired businesses and investments in six real estate joint ventures. CAM, which was formed in connection with the sale of BankAtlantic to BB&T Corporation (“BB&T”) and BBX Partners are wholly owned subsidiaries and their primary assets are investments in real estate joint ventures, non-performing commercial loans and foreclosed real estate formerly held by BankAtlantic.  FAR, which was also formed in connection with the sale of BankAtlantic to BB&T, is a special purpose limited liability company whose membership interests are held by BB&T, which holds 95% of FAR’s preferred interests. BBX Capital holds the remaining 5% of the preferred interests and all of the residual common equity interests.  FAR’s primary assets are performing and non-performing loans, and foreclosed real estate formerly held by BankAtlantic.  

 

In April 2013 BBX Capital acquired a 46% equity interest in Woodbridge. Woodbridge’s principal asset is its ownership of Bluegreen and its subsidiaries.  Bluegreen is a vacation ownership company with 180,000 owners and over 60 owned or managed resorts.  BFC owns the remaining 54% of Woodbridge. 

 

On October 30, 2013, a newly formed joint venture entity, Renin Holdings, LLC (“Renin”), owned 81% by BBX Capital and 19% by BFC, acquired substantially all of the assets and certain liabilities of Renin Corp for approximately $12.8 million (“the Renin Transaction”).  Renin had $24 million of total assets as of October 30, 2013 and manufactures interior closet doors, wall décor, hardware and fabricated glass products and operates through headquarters in Canada and two  manufacturing, assembly and distribution facilities in Canada, and the United States as well as a sales and distribution facility in the United Kingdom.

 

In December 2013, a wholly-owned subsidiary of BBX Capital, BBX Sweet Holdings, LLC, acquired Hoffman’s Chocolates and its subsidiaries Boca Bons, LLC (“Boca Bons”) and S&F Good Fortunes, LLC (“Good Fortunes”) (collectively “Hoffman’s”).  Hoffman’s had total assets of $5.3 million as of the acquisition date and is a manufacturer of gourmet chocolates, with retail locations in South Florida.   In January 2014, BBX Sweet Holdings acquired Williams and Bennett. William and Bennett had total assets of $1.3 million as of the acquisition date and is a manufacturer of chocolate products serving boutique retailers, big box chains, department stores, national resort properties, corporate customers, and private label brands.  In July 2014, BBX Sweet Holdings acquired Helen Grace Chocolates (“Helen Grace”), a California based manufacturer of premium chocolate confections, chocolate bars, chocolate candies and truffles with total assets at the acquisition date of $2.7 million.  In July 2014, BBX Sweet Holdings acquired Jer’s Chocolates (“Jer’s”), a California based distributor of peanut butter chocolate products internationally and in the United States.  Jer’s had total assets of $0.7 million as of the acquisition date.   In October 2014, BBX Sweet Holdings acquired the outstanding common shares of Anastasia Confections (“Anastasia”).  Anastasia is a premium confections company in Orlando, Florida, that manufactures gourmet coconut and chocolate candy, salt water taffy, and other chocolate gift products.  Anastasia had total assets of $3.3 million at the acquisition date.

 

In May 2013, BBX Capital entered into a definitive merger agreement (the “Merger Agreement”) with BFC and BBX Merger Sub, LLC, a newly formed wholly owned subsidiary of BFC (“Merger Sub”). The Merger Agreement provided for BBX Capital to merge with and into Merger Sub (the “Merger”), with Merger Sub continuing as the surviving company of the Merger and a wholly owned subsidiary of BFC.  On December 15, 2014, BBX Capital and BFC terminated the Merger Agreement.

 

On July 31, 2012, BBX Capital completed the sale to BB&T of all of the issued and outstanding shares of capital stock of BankAtlantic, the former wholly owned banking subsidiary of BBX Capital (the stock sale and related transactions are sometimes hereinafter referred to as the (“BB&T Transaction”). Pursuant to the terms of the stock purchase agreement between BBX Capital and BB&T prior to the closing of the BB&T Transaction, BankAtlantic formed two subsidiaries, CAM and FAR. BankAtlantic contributed to FAR certain performing and non-performing loans, tax certificates and real estate that had an aggregate carrying value on BankAtlantic’s statement of financial condition of

23

 


 

 

approximately $346 million as of July 31, 2012 (the date the BB&T Transaction was consummated). FAR assumed all liabilities related to these assets. BankAtlantic also contributed approximately $50 million in cash to FAR on July 31, 2012 and thereafter distributed all of the membership interests in FAR to BBX Capital. At the closing of the BB&T Transaction, BBX Capital transferred to BB&T 95% of the outstanding preferred membership interests in FAR in connection with BB&T’s assumption of BBX Capital’s outstanding trust preferred securities (“TruPS”) obligations. BBX Capital continues to hold the remaining 5% of FAR’s preferred membership interests. Under the terms of the Amended and Restated Limited Liability Company Agreement of FAR, which was entered into by BBX Capital and BB&T at the closing of the BB&T Transaction, BB&T will hold its 95% preferred interest in the net cash flows of FAR until such time as it has recovered $285 million in preference amount plus a priority return of LIBOR + 200 basis points per annum on any unpaid preference amount. At that time, BB&T’s interest in FAR will terminate, and BBX Capital will thereafter be entitled to any and all residual proceeds from FAR through its ownership of FAR’s Class R units. BBX Capital entered into an incremental $35 million guarantee in BB&T’s favor to further support BB&T’s recovery of the $285 million preferred interest within seven years. BB&T’s preferred interest in FAR as of December 31, 2014 was reduced through cash distributions to approximately $12.3 million. BBX Capital services FAR’s commercial loans and real estate and oversees the third party servicer that manages the other assets of FAR. Prior to the closing of the BB&T Transaction, BankAtlantic contributed to CAM certain non-performing commercial loans, commercial real estate and previously written-off assets that had an aggregate carrying value on BankAtlantic’s statement of financial condition of $125 million as of July 31, 2012. CAM assumed all liabilities related to these assets. BankAtlantic also contributed approximately $82 million in cash to CAM. Prior to the closing of the BB&T Transaction, BankAtlantic distributed all of the membership interests in CAM to BBX Capital. CAM remains a wholly owned subsidiary of BBX Capital.

 

Prior to the sale of BankAtlantic on July 31, 2012, BBX Capital was a bank holding company and its principal asset was the ownership of BankAtlantic, a federal savings bank.  Accordingly, as a result of such sale, the operations of BankAtlantic except for its commercial lending reporting unit are included in discontinued operations in our financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2012.  Operating financial information for continuing operations shown by segment is included in Note 23 to the Consolidated Financial Statements contained in this report.  BBX Capital reports its operations through four business segments – FAR, BBX, Renin and Sweet Holdings.

 

As of December 31, 2014, BBX Capital had consolidated total assets of approximately $392.9 million, liabilities of $81.7 million and total equity of $311.3 million. 

 

BBX Capital’s Business Strategy

 

Since the sale of BankAtlantic in July 2012, BBX Capital has been repositioning its business, monetizing its legacy portfolios of loans and real estate, and pursuing its goal of transitioning into a growth business by focusing on real estate opportunities and acquiring operating businesses. 

 

The majority of BBX Capitals assets do not generate income on a regular or predictable basis. Recognizing the nature of its assets, BBX Capital’s goal is to build long-term value.  BBX Capital does not expect to generate significant revenue from the legacy BankAtlantic assets until the assets are monetized through repayments or transactions involving the sale, joint venture or development of the underlying real estate. BBX Capital is currently utilizing the cash flow from the monetization of its assets and dividends from Woodbridge to pay operating expenses and to invest in income producing real estate, real estate developments, real estate joint ventures and operating businesses. BBX Capital is seeking to balance its cash needs and the timing of monetizing its existing assets with new investments to maximize its returns. In some cases, this may involve immediate sale and in other cases a longer term hold or development (either directly or through a joint venture).  BBX Capital may also consider subsidiary or asset dispositions with respect to its investments in operating businesses, including Renin and Sweet Holdings, and BBX Capital may in connection with its investment with BFC in Woodbridge pursue transactions involving Bluegreen, either directly or indirectly through a transaction involving Woodbridge, to monetize all or a portion of its investment in Woodbridge.  These may include pursuing a future sale or spin-off of a company or transactions involving other public or private issuances of a company’s debt or equity securities which might result in the ownership of less than 100% of the company.  BBX Capital is also engaged in land entitlement activities on certain properties that BBX Capital acquired through foreclosure and anticipates moving forward with land development projects which may include selling or leasing the improved properties to third parties or pursuing joint ventures with developers for the development of residential and commercial real estate projects involving the contribution of these properties by us all as potential cash investments in such projects.  BBX Capital is also pursuing potential investments in joint venture real estate projects that include real estate held by a joint venture partner or to be acquired from unrelated parties.  Furthermore, as a result of the substantial decline in real estate values during the recession, the majority of BBX Capital’s non-performing commercial real estate loans and foreclosed real estate were written down in prior periods to the then prevailing estimated fair values of the collateral less costs to sell.  BBX Capital believes there has been continued improvements generally in real estate markets and believes that the prior estimated fair values of the

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underlying collateral securing certain of its commercial real estate loans and its real estate carrying values may be below current market values.  Additionally, this recovery in the real estate market has favorably affected the financial condition of BBX Capital’s borrowers and BBX Capital is aggressively pursuing its borrowers and/or guarantors in order to maximize recoveries through cash settlements, loan workout arrangements or participation interests in the development or performance of the collateral.  If BBX Capital is successful in its efforts, BBX Capital expects to recognize gains to the extent that the amounts collected exceed the carrying value of its commercial loans and foreclosed real estate and expect these gains to be reflected in an increase in BBX Capital’s shareholders’ equity in the long term.  Due to the nature of these activities however, BBX Capital does not expect to generate revenues or earnings on a predictable or consistent basis.  Accordingly, BBX Capital expects its results of operations to vary significantly on a quarterly basis and BBX Capital may experience losses in subsequent periods.  

 

Legacy Assets

 

Loans

 

On July 31, 2012, BBX Capital completed the BB&T Transaction.  On November 1, 2011, BBX Capital entered into a definitive agreement to sell BankAtlantic to BB&T, which agreement was amended on March 13, 2012 (the “Agreement”). The Agreement was amended to, among other things provide for the assumption by BB&T of BBX Capital’s $285.4 million in principal amount of outstanding trust preferred securities (“TruPS”) obligations.  Under the terms of the Agreement, BBX Capital retained through CAM and FAR certain loans, tax certificates and foreclosed real estate and liabilities related to these retained assets, which have been held by BankAtlantic.  These retained loans were grouped in five loan segments as follows:   residential loans, commercial real estate loans, consumer loans, small business and commercial non-mortgage loans.  CAM holds loans from the commercial real estate and the commercial non-mortgage loan segments.  FAR holds loans from all five segments.

 

Residential:    The majority of BBX Capital’s residential loans were originally acquired in the secondary markets and were originated by financial institutions. These loans, which are serviced by independent servicers, are secured by properties located throughout the United States. Residential loans were typically purchased in bulk and were generally non-conforming loans under agency guidelines due primarily to the size of the individual loans (“jumbo loans”). BBX Capital also retained a portfolio of residential loans which were made primarily to “low to moderate income” borrowers in accordance with the Community Reinvestment Act.  The portfolio of Community Reinvestment Act loans were sold during the year ended December 31, 2014.  BBX Capital’s residential loans were classified as loans held-for-sale as of December 31, 2014.

 

Commercial Real Estate: Commercial real estate loans were originated in connection with the acquisition, development and construction of various types of properties by our borrowers including office buildings, retail shopping centers, residential construction and other non-residential properties.  Commercial real estate loans were also originated in connection with a borrower’s acquisition or refinance of existing income-producing properties. These loans were primarily secured by property located in Florida.

 

A portion of certain commercial real estate loans were sold to other financial institutions as participations.  The loans are administered by BBX Capital or on its behalf by a third party servicer and participants are provided periodic reports on the progress of the project for which the loan was made.

 

Commercial non-mortgage loans: These loans are generally business loans secured by the receivables, inventory, equipment, and/or general corporate assets of the borrowers. 

 

Consumer: Consumer loans consist primarily of loans to individuals originated through BankAtlantic’s retail network.  The majority of consumer loans are home equity lines of credit secured by a first or second mortgage on the primary residence of the borrower, substantially all of which are located in Florida.

 

Small Business:  BankAtlantic originated small business loans to companies located primarily in markets within BankAtlantic’s branch network.  Small business loans were originated primarily on a secured basis and do not generally exceed $2.0 million individually. These loans were  originated with maturities ranging generally from one to three years or are due upon demand.  Lines of credit extended to small businesses are due upon demand.  Small business loans have either fixed or variable prime-based interest rates.  BBX Capital’s small business loans were classified as loans held-for-sale as of December 31, 2014.

 

Real Estate

 

Real estate was generally acquired through foreclosure or contractual settlements with borrowers.  Real estate is classified into two categories: real estate held-for-sale or real estate held-for-investment.

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Real estate held-for-sale:    Real estate is classified as held-for-sale when the property is available for immediate sale in its present condition, management commits to a plan to sell the property, an active program to locate a buyer has been initiated, the property is being marketed at a price that is reasonable in relation to its current fair value and it is likely that a sale will be completed within one year.

 

Real estate held-for-investment:    Real estate is classified as held-for-investment when the property is not available for immediate sale due to anticipated renovations and potential improvements in operating performance before sale, management is pursuing joint venture opportunities, potential development, or management has decided to retain the property in anticipation of appreciation in market value in subsequent periods. 

 

BBX Capital Business Segments

 

BBX Capital operates through four reportable business segments-BBX, FAR, Renin, and Sweet Holdings.

 

BBX Reportable Segment - The BBX reportable segment consists of the activities associated with managing its commercial loan portfolio, real estate properties, and portfolio of charged off loans as well as its investment in Woodbridge and investments in real estate joint ventures. 

 

FAR Reportable Segment - The FAR reportable segment consists of the activities associated with overseeing the management and monetization of FAR’s assets with a view to the repayment of BB&T’s preferred membership interest and maximizing the cash flows of any remaining assets.

 

Renin Reportable Segment - The Renin reportable segment consists of the activities of Renin.  Renin was acquired in October 2013.  The Renin reportable segment includes the results of operations of Renin for the two months ended December 31, 2013 and year ended December 31, 2014.

 

Sweet Holdings Reportable Segment - The Sweet Holdings reportable segment consists of the activities of Hoffman’s and Williams & Bennett for the year ended December 31, 2014, and the activities of Jer’s, Helen Grace and Anastasia from their respective dates of acquisition, July 1, 2014, July 21, 2014 and October 1, 2014 through December 31, 2014.  In 2013, Hoffman’s was included for the month of December 2013.

 

BBX Business Segment

 

Since the sale of BankAtlantic to BB&T, BBX has been engaged in managing the assets in CAM and the commercial loans that it services for FAR as well as overseeing the third party servicers that manage the assets for FAR.  BBX Capital also continues to manage the assets held by BBX Partners, Inc., its wholly owned asset workout subsidiary established in 2008 (formerly BankAtlantic Bancorp Partners, Inc.) which consisted of approximately $14.3 million of loans, foreclosed real estate and real estate improvements as of December 31, 2014 compared to $13.5 million of loans and foreclosed real estate as of December 31, 2013.

 

The BBX business segment includes the assets and related liabilities of CAM, BBX Partners, and the Woodbridge investment and BBX Capital’s investments in real estate joint ventures.  CAM was formed prior to the closing of the BB&T Transaction when BankAtlantic contributed to CAM cash and certain non-performing commercial loans, commercial real estate and previously written-off assets. CAM assumed the liabilities related to these assets.   

 

The BBX business segment’s primary assets are loans receivable, real estate held-for-sale and real estate held-for-investment, investments in real estate joint ventures and rights to BankAtlantic’s previously charged off loan portfolio and related judgments which were transferred to CAM in connection with the consummation of the BB&T Transaction as well as its 46% equity interest in Woodbridge.  BBX utilized the cash received in the BB&T Transaction and funds from the monetization of assets to acquire a 46% equity interest in Woodbridge for $60.4 million in cash and a promissory note in Woodbridge’s favor in the principal amount of $11.75 million. 

 

BBX Capital acquired a 46% interest in Woodbridge in April 2013.  Woodbridge’s principal asset is its ownership of Bluegreen.  Bluegreen is a sales, marketing and management company focused on the vacation ownership industry. Bluegreen markets, sells and manages vacation ownership interests (“VOIs”) in resorts, which are generally located in popular, high-volume, “drive-to” vacation destinations, and were either developed or acquired by Bluegreen or developed and owned by others, in which case Bluegreen earns fees for providing such services. Bluegreen utilizes a points-based system, known as the Bluegreen Vacation Club, where purchasers of VOIs are allotted points that represent their ownership and beneficial use rights in perpetuity in the Bluegreen Vacation Club and can be used to reserve occupancy at participating resorts. Bluegreen Vacation Club members may use their points to stay in any of Bluegreen Vacation Club resorts or take advantage of other vacation options, including an exchange program offered

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by a third-party world-wide vacation ownership exchange network of over 4,000 resorts and other vacation experiences such as cruises and hotel stays. Bluegreen also provides property association management services, mortgage servicing, VOI title services, reservation services, and construction design and development services. In addition, Bluegreen provides financing to individual purchasers of VOIs, which provides significant interest income to Bluegreen.  Bluegreen had total assets of $1.0 billion as of December 31, 2014 and income from continuing operations of $68.6 million, $56.5 million and $64.3 million for the years ended December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively.    

 

BBX Capital had investments in joint ventures of approximately $16.1 million as of December 31, 2014.  BBX Capital anticipates actively pursuing additional joint venture investments with real estate developers which may involve BBX Capital’s contribution of held-for-investment real estate acquired through foreclosure or purchasing real estate with its own funds for joint venture development or investing funds in developments identified by joint venture partners.  BBX Capital currently expect that in most cases, the real estate developer will be responsible for the management of the project and BBX Capital will participate in major decisions and monitor the development’s progress.  These joint venture real estate developments are anticipated to include multifamily and single family housing, commercial retail complexes, office buildings and land entitlement projects.  To a lesser extent, BBX Capital may engage in land entitlement and development activities without joint venture partners.  These anticipated real estate investments will in most instances be multi-year projects and BBX Capital does not expect them to generate earnings in the near term. BBX Capital’s goal is to produce earnings from these projects over time; however, they may not be successful in doing so. 

 

BBX reportable segment had investments in the following real estate joint ventures as of December 31, 2014 and 2013 (in thousands):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

December 31,

 

 

2014

2013

Altis at Kendall Square, LLC

$

1,264 
1,300 

Altis at Lakeline - Austin Investors LLC

 

5,000 

 -

New Urban/BBX Development, LLC

 

996 
54 

Sunrise and Bayview Partners, LLC

 

1,723 

 -

Hialeah Communities, LLC

 

5,091 

 -

PGA Design Center Holdings, LLC

 

1,991 

 -

Investments in unconsolidated real estate joint ventures

$

16,065 
1,354 

Investments in consolidated real estate joint ventures

$

964 
478 

 

 

Kendall Commons (Altis at Kendall Square, LLC)

 

In March 2013, BBX Capital sold land to Altman Development (“Altman”), a third party real estate developer, for net proceeds of $8.0 million.  Altman is developing a multifamily rental community comprised of 12 three-story apartment buildings, one mixed-use building and one clubhouse totaling 321 apartment units.  BBX Capital has invested $1.3 million of cash in the project as one of a number of investors.  The first two buildings have been completed with the balance of the buildings expected to be completed in 2015.  After all members (including BBX Capital) receive a preferred return of 10% and all contributed capital is returned, BBX Capital is entitled to receive 13% of venture distributions until a 15% internal rate of return has been attained and thereafter BBX Capital will be entitled to receive 9.75% of any venture distributions.

 

Altis at Lakeline – Austin Investor, LLC

 

In December 2014, BBX Capital invested $5.0 million in a planned multi-family development – Altis at Lakeline being developed by Altman.  Located on an approximate 23 acre parcel in the northwest area of Austin, Texas, Altis at Lakeline is planned for 19, two and three story, residential apartment buildings with 354 apartment units, 38 enclosed garages, and a clubhouse.  Altis at Lakeline, a gated community, is planned to feature a mix of studio, one, two and three bedroom apartment homes and a private resort style 5,500 square foot clubhouse.  Other planned amenities include a pool and spa, an outdoor activities pavilion with a sports bar and full demonstration kitchen, a full circuit fitness center, and kids’ play and study area.  After all investors receive a preferred return of 9% and all contributed capital is returned, BBX Capital is entitled to receive 26.3% of venture distributions until an 18% internal rate of return has been attained and thereafter BBX Capital will be entitled to receive 18.8% of any venture distributions.

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Village at Victoria Park (New Urban/BBX Development, LLC)

Village at Victoria Park consists of approximately 2 acres of vacant land previously owned by BBX Capital that is located near downtown Fort Lauderdale, Florida. In December 2013, BBX Capital entered into a joint venture agreement with New Urban Communities to develop the project as 30 single-family homes.  The project is a 50%-50% joint venture, with New Urban Communities serving as the developer and manager.  In April 2014, the joint venture executed an acquisition, development and construction loan with a financial institution and BBX Capital and New Urban Communities each contributed an additional $692,000 to the joint venture as a capital contribution.  The joint venture purchased the vacant land from BBX Capital for $3.6 million consisting of $1.8 million in cash (less $0.2 million in selling expenses) and a $1.6 million promissory note.  The $1.6 million promissory note is secured by a junior lien on the vacant land and future improvements and subordinated to the acquisition, development and construction loan.  The project commenced construction and sales during the third quarter of 2014.   Closings are projected to begin during the third quarter of 2015.

 

Bayview (Sunrise and Bayview Partners, LLC)

 

In June 2014, BBX Capital entered into a joint venture agreement with an affiliate of Procacci Development Corporation.  The joint venture acquired for $8.0 million approximately three acres of real estate located at Bayview Drive and Sunrise Boulevard in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.  The new joint venture entity, Sunrise and Bayview Partners, LLC, is a 50% - 50% joint venture between BBX Capital and an affiliate of Procacci Development.  The property is currently improved with an approximate 84,000 square foot office building along with a convenience store and gas station, and located minutes from the Fort Lauderdale beaches and directly across from the Galleria at Ft. Lauderdale.  The office building has low occupancy with short term leases.  The convenience store’s lease ends in March 2017 with a five year extension option.  BBX Capital anticipates the property will be redeveloped into a mixed-use project at some point in the future.

 

Hialeah Communities, LLC (Bonterra – CC Devco Homes)

 

During the third quarter of 2014, BBX Capital entered into a joint venture agreement with CC Devco Homes- a Codina-Carr Company, to develop homes in a portion of the newly proposed Bonterra Communities (formerly called the Hialeah Communities) in Hialeah, Florida.  As the developer and manager of the joint venture, CC Devco Homes currently plans to build approximately 394 single-family homes.    BBX Capital transferred approximately 50 acres of land at an agreed upon value of approximately $15.6 million subject to an $8.3 million mortgage which was assumed by the joint venture.  In exchange, BBX Capital received its joint venture interest and $2.2 million of cash.  Anticipated project profits resulting from the joint venture will be distributed to CC Devco Homes and BBX Capital on a 55% and 45% basis, respectively.  Any necessary additional capital for the joint venture are required to be contributed by CC Devco Homes and BBX Capital on a 43% and 57% basis, respectively.  In September 2014, the joint venture acquired nine acres of land and BBX Capital acquired four acres of land adjacent to the property from unrelated third parties. The project is in the final stages of planning and subject to receipt of government approvals. Construction is anticipated to commence in the first half of 2015.  BBX Capital is a guarantor for 26.3% of the joint venture’s $31.0 million acquisition and development loan.  (The Bonterra - CC Devco Homes joint venture is part of the master-planned community project, Bonterra Communities, discussed below.) 

 

PGA Design Center Holdings, LLC

 

In December 2013, BBX Capital purchased for $6.1 million a commercial property in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida, with three existing buildings consisting of 145,000 square feet of mainly furniture retail space. The property, which is located in a larger mixed use property now known as PGA Place, was substantially vacant at the date of acquisition.  Subsequent to the acquisition of the property, BBX Capital entered into a joint venture with Stiles Development which acquired a 60% interest in the joint venture for $2.9 million in cash.  BBX Capital contributed the property (excluding certain residential development entitlements having an estimated value of $1.2 million) to the joint venture in exchange for $2.9 million in cash and the remaining 40% interest in the joint venture.  BBX Capital transferred the retained residential development entitlements to adjacent parcels owned by it in the PGA mixed use property now known as PGA Place (see below for a discussion of the other parcels owned by BBX Capital in PGA Place).  The joint venture intends to seek governmental approvals to change the use of a portion of the property from retail to office and subsequently sell or lease the property.  The joint venture entered into a contract to sell an 80,000 square foot building, subject to receiving the necessary entitlements and the potential purchaser’s due diligence.

 

North Flagler (JRG/BBX Development, LLC)

 

In October 2013, BBX Capital entered into a joint venture with JRG USA pursuant to which JRG USA assigned to the joint venture a contract to purchase for $10.8 million a 4.5 acre parcel overlooking the Intracoastal Waterway in West

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Palm Beach, Florida and BBX Capital invested $0.5 million of cash.  During 2015, the joint venture was successful in its efforts to amend the current zoning designation and the parcel’s residential height restrictions were changed allowing up to 15 stories in building height from 4 stories.   BBX Capital believes this change in the parcel’s height restrictions will significantly increase the value of the joint venture’s 4.5 acre parcel.   BBX Capital is entitled to receive 80% of any joint venture distributions until it recovers its capital investment and thereafter will be entitled to receive 70% of any joint venture distributions.  The joint venture is soliciting third party developer partners for the potential development of this property.

 

BBX Capital also owns a 2.7 acre parcel located adjacent to the 4.5 acre parcel which is the subject of the contract held by the North Flagler joint venture with JRG USA.  The 2.7 acre parcel was acquired by BBX Capital through foreclosure and had a carrying value of $3.2 million as of December 31, 2014.  BBX Capital believes that the fair value of this parcel increased by the municipality’s approval of the zoning changes referenced in the preceding paragraph.

 

BBX Capital is currently engaged through the BBX reportable segment in entitlement and planning activities with respect to the development of the following properties that were obtained through foreclosure.

 

Gardens at Millenia

 

Gardens at Millenia consists of approximately 86 acres of land, including a 47 acre lake, located near the Mall at Millenia in a commercial center in Orlando, Florida with a carrying value of $12.4 million as of December 31, 2014.  BBX Capital completed permitting and is currently developing the property to reclaim approximately 15 acres of the lake as additional developable property for a total of 54 developable acres.  The proposed plans for the 54 developable acres include a 460,000 square foot retail shopping center with multiple big-box and in-line tenants as well as four outparcel retail pads.  An agreement to sell a portion of the land to a big box retailer was entered into and is subject to the buyer’s due diligence. BBX Capital is finalizing negotiations with a potential retail joint venture partner to develop approximately 13.4 acres of the site.  Current plans for approximately 11.8 acres of this site include nine retail apartment buildings totaling approximately 292 units, a clubhouse, lakeside pavilion, lakeside running trail, and a dog park.  BBX Capital is finalizing negotiations with a potential joint venture partner to develop the 11.8 acre parcel.

 

Bonterra Communities – (formerly Hialeah Communities)

 

Bonterra Communities is a proposed master-planned community anticipated to be built on an approximate 128 acres of land consisting of a 59 acre parcel owned by the Bonterra – CC Devco Homes joint venture (discussed above).  Once completed, Bonterra Communities is planned to have approximately 1,171 single-family homes, villas, town homes, and apartments, along with amenities including a clubhouse, fitness center, resort pool, parks, and a 15 acre lake.  The Bonterra community site is currently in the final stages of master-planning and our plans continue to be subject to receipt of required governmental approvals.  It is anticipated that the community will be divided into three parcels, which are anticipated to include: 

 

1.

As discussed in the Bonterra - CC Devco Homes joint venture paragraph above, an approximate 59 acre parcel to be developed with approximately 394 single-family homes by a joint venture between BBX Capital and CC Devco Homes.

2.

An approximate 14 acre parcel owned by BBX Capital with a carrying value of $5.3 million as of December 31, 2014, to be developed with approximately 314 rental apartment units.  BBX Capital is currently seeking required entitlements and plans to partner with a third party developer to develop this parcel.

3.

An approximate 55 acre parcel owned by BBX Capital with a carrying value of $17.1 million as of December  31, 2014, to be developed with approximately 463 additional single-family homes, villas and townhomes.  BBX Capital has a contract to sell this parcel, subject to the receipt of entitlements currently being sought and due diligence by the purchaser.

 

PGA Place

 

In the fourth quarter of 2014, BBX Capital sold a 33,000 square foot office building in PGA Place for $6.6 million.  BBX Capital continues to own land located in the newly named PGA Place, in the city of Palm Beach Gardens, Florida, with carrying values aggregating $3.6 million as of December 31, 2014.  The property held by the PGA Design Center Holdings joint venture described above is adjacent to PGA Place.  BBX Capital believes this property presents a variety of development opportunities, some of which are currently in the planning stages and remain subject to receipt of government approvals.   BBX Capital is currently seeking governmental approvals for a 126 room limited-service suite hotel, a 5,000 square foot freestanding restaurant and a 60,000 square foot office building and up to 300 apartment units on vacant tracts of land.  BBX Capital anticipates partnering with one or more third party developers to develop all or a portion of these components of the project. 

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The composition of the BBX reportable segment’s legacy loans was (in thousands):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As of December 31, 2014

 

As of December 31, 2013

 

 

 

 

Unpaid

 

 

 

 

 

Unpaid

 

 

 

 

 

 

Principal

 

Carrying

 

 

 

Principal

 

Carrying

Loans held-for-investment:

 

Number

 

Balance

 

Amount

 

Number

 

Balance

 

Amount

Loans receivable:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commercial non-real estate:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accruing

 

 -

 

$              -

 

$              -

 

 -

 

$              -

 

$                      -

Non-accruing

 

 

3,061 

 

1,326 

 

 

5,107 

 

3,331 

Commercial real estate:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accruing

 

 

2,112 

 

2,112 

 

 

2,152 

 

2,152 

Non-accruing

 

 

12,944 

 

4,433 

 

 

27,077 

 

11,526 

Total loans held-for-investment         

 

 

$    18,117

 

$      7,871

 

 

$    34,336

 

$            17,009

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Loans held-for-sale

 

 -

 

$              -

 

$              -

 

 -

 

$              -

 

$                      -

 

 

The composition of the BBX reportable segment’s legacy real estate was (in thousands): 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As of December 31, 2014

 

As of December 31, 2013

 

 

 

 

Carrying

 

 

 

Carrying

 

 

Number

 

Amount

 

Number

 

Amount

Real estate held-for-investment:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Land

 

16 

 

$     56,461

 

13 

 

$     75,333

Rental properties

 

 -

 

 -

 

 

15,705 

Other

 

 

789 

 

 

789 

Total real estate held-for-investment

 

17 

 

$     57,250

 

16 

 

$     91,827

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Real estate held-for-sale:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Land

 

12 

 

$     27,661

 

10 

 

$     10,307

Rental properties

 

 -

 

 -

 

 -

 

 -

Residential single-family

 

 

327 

 

 -

 

 -

Total real estate held-for-sale

 

14 

 

$     27,988

 

10 

 

$     10,307

 

 

FAR Segment

 

FAR’s operations consist of overseeing the management and monetization of its assets through regularly scheduled payments and, where appropriate, orderly liquidations with a view to repaying its preferred membership interests and maximizing the cash flows of any remaining assets.  FAR’s assets consist primarily of loans receivable and foreclosed real estate. 

 

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The composition of FAR’s foreclosed real estate was (in thousands): 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As of December 31, 2014

 

As of December 31, 2013

 

 

 

 

Carrying

 

 

 

Carrying

 

 

Number

 

Amount

 

Number

 

Amount

Real estate held-for-investment:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Land

 

 

$       3,895

 

 

$       4,323

Rental properties

 

 

14,445 

 

 

11,186 

Total real estate held-for-investment

 

 

$     18,340

 

 

$     15,509

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Real estate held-for-sale:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Land

 

 

$       5,844

 

 

$       7,961

Rental properties

 

 

1,748 

 

 

6,168 

Residential single-family

 

12 

 

4,058 

 

29 

 

6,447 

Other

 

13 

 

2,095 

 

23 

 

3,088 

Total real estate held-for-sale

 

32 

 

$     13,745

 

63 

 

$     23,664

 

 

Rental properties held-for-investment as of December 31, 2014 consisted of two student housing facilities in Tallahassee, Florida, Villa San Michele and Eagle’s Point. 

 

Villa San Michele

 

In January 2014, FAR acquired an 82-unit, 272 bed student housing project located in Tallahassee, Florida, through a contractual settlement with the borrower.  Built in 2008, Villa San Michele is located in southwest Tallahassee near Tallahassee Community College.  The project includes a mix of 3 bedroom and 4 bedroom 2-story townhomes, as well as a 10.6 acre parcel of vacant land.  FAR has engaged a property management company specializing in student housing to manage the day to day operations and leasing of the property.  Various common area improvements are planned for 2015, with the objective of repositioning the property and increasing occupancy.  Villa San Michele had a carrying value of $6.1 million as of December 31, 2014.

 

Eagles Point

 

In September 2013, FAR acquired a 168-unit 336 bed student housing project located adjacent to Tallahassee Community College in Tallahassee, Florida, through a contractual settlement with the borrower.  The residential units at Eagle’s Point consist of 2-story, 2 bedroom townhomes and 16 apartment units (32 beds).  The 16 apartment units are uninhabitable due to extensive damage that occurred before FAR acquired the property. A property improvement plan is in place for 2015, which includes unit renovations, repairs to offline units, as well as selected upgrades to common areas.  FAR has engaged a property management company specializing in student housing to manage the day to day operations and leasing of the property.   Eagle’s Point had a carrying value of $8.4 million as of December 31, 2014.

 

RoboVault

 

An operating property included in properties and equipment in the Consolidated Statement of Financial Condition contained in Item 8 of this report consisted of the RoboVault public storage facility with an $8.4 million and $7.9 million carrying value as of December 31, 2014 and 2013, respectively.

 

In April 2013, FAR acquired through foreclosure RoboVault, a 155,000 square foot high-tech, robotic self-storage facility, featuring climate controlled, and high security storage.  Located in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, RoboVault provides its clients museum quality storage for business, forensic property, and personal prized possessions, including art, wine collections, cars, gems, antiques, important documents and files, and other collectibles.  RoboVault’s additional services include crating, handling, moving, and shipping and storage services for its clients throughout the United States and Europe.  Built in 2009, the facility is wind resistant up to 200 mph (a category 5 hurricane), stores items 30 feet above sea level, uses a biometric robotic transfer system, and offers 24 hour -7 day access.

 

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The composition of FAR’s loans was (in thousands): 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As of December 31, 2014

 

As of December 31, 2013

 

 

 

 

Unpaid

 

 

 

 

 

Unpaid

 

 

 

 

 

 

Principal

 

Carrying

 

 

 

Principal

 

Carrying

Loans held-for-investment:

 

Number

 

Balance

 

Amount

 

Number

 

Balance

 

Amount

Loans receivable:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commercial non-real estate:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accruing

 

 -

 

$              -

 

$              -

 

 -

 

$              -

 

$                      -

Non-accruing

 

 -

 

 -

 

 -

 

 -

 

 -

 

 -

Commercial real estate:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accruing

 

 

7,613 

 

7,613 

 

 

15,245 

 

15,245 

Non-accruing

 

 

17,601 

 

10,031 

 

10 

 

52,108 

 

34,014 

Consumer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accruing

 

 

316 

 

316 

 

62 

 

5,646 

 

5,646 

Non-accruing

 

31 

 

3,552 

 

1,990 

 

43 

 

5,846 

 

2,972 

Residential:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accruing

 

 -

 

 -

 

 -

 

 -

 

 -

 

 -

Non-accruing

 

 -

 

 -

 

 -

 

 

189 

 

53 

Total loans held-for-investment

 

43 

 

$    29,082

 

$    19,950

 

124 

 

$    79,034

 

$            57,930

Loans held-for-sale:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Commercial real estate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accruing

 

 -

 

$              -

 

$              -

 

 -

 

$              -

 

$                      -

Non-accruing

 

 -

 

 -

 

 -

 

 -

 

 -

 

 -

 Consumer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accruing

 

48 

 

4,204 

 

1,854 

 

15 

 

2,044 

 

1,494 

Non-accruing

 

 

1,172 

 

497 

 

31 

 

4,135 

 

2,682 

 Residential

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accruing

 

11 

 

1,921 

 

1,854 

 

34 

 

4,912 

 

3,945 

Non-accruing

 

125 

 

41,411 

 

25,478 

 

255 

 

58,603 

 

34,278 

 Small business

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accruing

 

34 

 

6,208 

 

4,486 

 

52 

 

10,320 

 

8,170 

Non-accruing

 

 

1,971 

 

1,254 

 

17 

 

4,204 

 

3,277 

Total loans held-for-sale

 

232 

 

$    56,887

 

$    35,423

 

404 

 

$    84,218

 

$            53,846

 

(1)  See explanation of loan products above.

 

Renin Segment

 

Renin Holdings, which is owned 81% by BBX Capital and 19% by BFC, acquired Renin Corp on October 30, 2013.  Renin is headquartered in Brampton, Ontario and has two manufacturing, assembly and distribution facilities located in Brampton, Ontario and Tupelo, Mississippi and a sales and distribution office in the U.K. Renin manufactures interior closet doors, wall décor, hardware and fabricated glass products and its distribution channels include big box and independent home improvement retailers, builders, other manufacturers and specialty retail outlets primarily in North America.  Renin had total revenues for the year ended December 31, 2014 of $57.8 million and total assets as of December 31, 2014 of $24.1 million. 

 

Sweet Holdings Segment

 

The Sweet Holding business segment activities consist of the operations of its acquired businesses in the candy and confections industry.  Hoffman’s, Williams and Bennett, Jer’s, Helen Grace and Anastasia were acquired in December 2013, January 2014, July 2014, July 2014 and October 2014, respectively.  Revenues from these acquisitions which are included in the Consolidated Statement of Operations for the year ended December 31, 2014 aggregated $16.3 million.  These acquired businesses had total assets as of December 31, 2014 of $31.6 million. The pro forma revenues from the 2014 acquisitions had the acquisition dates been January 1, 2014 was approximately $23.6 million.

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Employees

 

Management believes that its relations with its employees are satisfactory. BFC currently maintains employee benefit programs that are considered by management to be generally competitive with programs provided by other major employers in its markets.

 

As of December 31, 2014, BFC and its subsidiaries had approximately 5,364 employees, with 28 employees at BFC and its wholly owned subsidiaries; 413 employees at BBX Capital and its subsidiaries, including Renin and Sweet Holdings; and 4,923 employees at Bluegreen, of which 523 were located at Bluegreen’s headquarters in Boca Raton, Florida, and 4,400 were located in regional field offices throughout the United States and Aruba.  

 

Competition

 

BBX Capital

 

The industries in which BBX Capital conducts business are very competitive and BBX Capital faces substantial competition from insurance companies, financial institutions, private equity funds, hedge funds and real estate developers. BBX Capital competes with institutions and entities that are larger and have greater resources than the resources available to them.  There are four companies in the candy and confections industry that account for approximately 68% of the industry’s revenues.  Renin operations include the manufacturing of wall décor, hardware, and fabricated glass.  Renin’s products are sold mainly to housing and other building construction companies.  The housing and building construction industries have seen demand for their products decline significantly over the past five years. This decline in demand resulted in intense competition from the entities that remain in the industries including competition from foreign importers and producers. 

 

Bluegreen

 

Bluegreen competes with various high profile and well-established operators, many of which have greater liquidity and financial resources than Bluegreen does. Many of the world’s most recognized lodging, hospitality and entertainment companies develop and sell VOIs in resort properties. Major companies that now operate or are developing or planning to develop vacation ownership resorts directly or through subsidiaries include Marriott Vacations Worldwide Corporation, the Walt Disney Company, Hilton Hotels Corporation, Hyatt Corporation, Starwood Hotels and Resorts Worldwide, Inc., Wyndham Worldwide Corporation and Diamond Resorts International.  Bluegreen also competes with numerous other smaller owners and operators of vacation ownership resorts. In Bluegreen’s fee-based services business, Bluegreen typically competes with Hilton Hotels Corporation and Wyndham Worldwide Corporation. In addition to competing for sales leads, prospects and fee-based service clients, Bluegreen competes with other VOI developers for marketing, sales, and resort management personnel.

 

Regulation

 

BFC and BBX Capital

 

As a result of their respective historic direct and indirect ownership interests in BankAtlantic, both BBX Capital and BFC were unitary savings and loan holding companies subject to examination and regulation by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (the “Federal Reserve”).  As a result of BBX Capital’s sale of BankAtlantic, effective July 31, 2012, BBX Capital and BFC were released from registration as savings and loan holding companies.  As such, both BBX Capital and BFC are no longer subject to regulation by the Federal Reserve or restrictions applicable to financial institution holding companies.  

 

As public companies, BFC and BBX Capital are each subject to reporting and other requirements of the Exchange Act. 

 

Bluegreen

 

The vacation ownership and real estate industries are subject to extensive and complex governmental regulation.  Bluegreen is subject to various federal, state, local and foreign environmental, zoning, consumer protection and other statutes and regulations regarding the acquisition, marketing and sale of real estate and VOIs and various aspects of Bluegreen’s financing operations. On a federal level, the Federal Trade Commission has taken an active regulatory role through the Federal Trade Commission Act, which prohibits unfair or deceptive acts or unfair competition in interstate commerce. In addition, many states have what are known as “Little FTC Acts” that apply to intrastate activity. In addition to the laws applicable to Bluegreen customer financing and other operations discussed below, Bluegreen is or may be subject to the Fair Housing Act and various other federal statutes and regulations.  Bluegreen is

33

 


 

 

also subject to various foreign laws with respect to La Cabana Beach and Racquet Club in Oranjestad, Aruba and Blue Water Resort in Nassau, Bahamas as well as with respect to certain marketing efforts and operations in Canada. In addition, in the future, VOIs may be deemed to be securities subject to regulation as such, which could have a material adverse effect on Bluegreen. The cost of complying with applicable laws and regulations may be significant and Bluegreen may not maintain compliance at all times with all applicable laws, including those discussed below. Any failure to comply with current or future applicable laws or regulations could have a material adverse effect on Bluegreen.

 

Bluegreen vacation ownership resorts are subject to various regulatory requirements, including state and local approvals. The laws of most states require Bluegreen to file a detailed offering statement describing Bluegreen’s business and all material aspects of the project and sale of VOIs with a designated state authority. In addition, when required by state law, Bluegreen provides its VOI purchasers with a public disclosure statement that contains, among other items, detailed information about the resort, the surrounding vicinity, and the purchaser’s rights and obligations as a VOI owner.  Laws in each state where Bluegreen sells VOIs generally grant the purchaser of a VOI the right to cancel a purchase contract at any time within a specified rescission period following the earlier of the date the contract was signed or the date the purchaser has received the last of the documents required to be provided by Bluegreen. Most states have other laws that regulate Bluegreen’s activities, including: real estate licensure; sellers of travel licensure; anti-fraud laws; telemarketing laws; prize, gift and sweepstakes laws; and labor laws.  

 

Under various federal, state and local laws, ordinances and regulations, the owner of real property generally is liable for the costs of removal or remediation of certain hazardous or toxic substances located on or in, or emanating from, the property, as well as related costs of investigation and property damage. These laws often impose such liability without regard to whether the owner knew of the presence of such hazardous or toxic substances. The presence of these substances, or the failure to properly remediate these substances if they exist, may adversely affect the owner’s ability to sell or lease a property or to borrow using the real property as collateral. Other federal and state laws require the removal or encapsulation of asbestos-containing material when this material is in poor condition or in the event of construction, demolition, remodeling or renovation. Other statutes may require the removal of underground storage tanks. Noncompliance with these and other environmental, health or safety requirements may result in the need to cease or alter operations or development at a property. In addition, certain state and local laws may impose liability on property developers with respect to construction defects discovered on the property or repairs made by future owners of such property. Under these laws, Bluegreen may be required to pay for repairs to the developed property.  The development, management and operation of Bluegreen resorts are also subject to the Americans with Disabilities Act.

 

Bluegreen’s customer financing activities are also subject to extensive regulation, which can include, but is not limited to: the Truth-in-Lending Act and Regulation Z; the Fair Housing Act; the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act; the Equal Credit Opportunity Act and Regulation B; the Electronic Funds Transfer Act and Regulation E; the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act and Regulation C; the Dodd–Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act; Unfair or Deceptive Acts or Practices and Regulation AA; the Patriot Act; the Right to Financial Privacy Act; the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act; the Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act; and anti-money laundering laws. The Dodd-Frank Act contains significant changes to the regulation of financial institutions, and related entities, including the creation of new federal regulatory agencies, and the granting of additional authorities and responsibilities to existing regulatory agencies to identify and address emerging systemic risks posed by the activities of financial services firms.  While certain rules and regulations have been proposed and, in some cases finalized, the rule-making process under the Dodd-Frank Act is still underway.  It is not clear what final form any such rules and regulations will take, how they will be implemented and interpreted, or if Bluegreen will be affected.  No assurance can be given that the new standards will not have an adverse impact on Bluegreen.

 

Bluegreen's management of, and dealings with, POAs, including Bluegreen's purchase of defaulted inventory from POAs in connection with its secondary market arrangements, is also subject to state laws and resort rules and regulations, including those with respect to the establishment of budgets and expenditures, rule-making, and the imposition of maintenance assessments.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2014, approximately 10% of Bluegreen’s VOI sales were generated by marketing to prospective purchasers obtained through internal and affiliated telemarketing efforts. Further, an additional approximate 6% of Bluegreen’s VOI sales during the year ended December 31, 2014 were generated by marketing to prospective purchasers obtained from third-party VOI prospect vendors, many of whom use telemarketing operations to generate these prospects.  Bluegreen attempts to monitor the actions and compliance of these third parties, but there are risks associated with their use. In recent years, state regulators have increased regulations and enforcement actions related to telemarketing operations, including requiring the adherence to state “do not call” laws. In addition, the Federal Trade Commission and Federal Communications Commission have implemented national “do not call” legislation. These measures have significantly increased the costs associated with telemarketing. While Bluegreen continues to be subject to telemarketing risks and potential liability, Bluegreen believes that its exposure to adverse

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impacts from this heightened telemarketing legislation and enforcement may be mitigated to some extent by the use of “permission marketing,” whereby Bluegreen obtains the permission of prospective purchasers to contact them in the future, thereby exempting such calls from the various “do not call” laws.  Bluegreen has also implemented policies and procedures which Bluegreen believes will help reduce the possibility that individuals who have requested to be placed on its internal company do not call list are not contacted, but such policies and procedures may not be effective in ensuring strict regulatory compliance.

 

To date, Bluegreen has not been subject to any material fines or penalties as a result of its telemarketing operations.  However, from time to time, Bluegreen has been the subject of proceedings for violation of the “do not call” laws and for violation of state laws applicable to the marketing and sale of VOIs. Bluegreen may not be able to efficiently or effectively market to prospective purchasers through telemarketing operations in the future or successfully develop alternative sources of identifying and marketing to prospective purchasers of Bluegreen’s VOI products at acceptable costs. In addition, Bluegreen may face significant non-compliance issues or additional costs of compliance, which may adversely impact Bluegreen’s operations in the future.

 

See also “Item 1A – Risk Factors for a description of risks with respect to regulatory compliance and “Item 3 – Legal Proceedings” for a description of pending regulatory actions.

 

 

 

 

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ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

 

We and our subsidiaries are subject to various risks and uncertainties relating to or arising out of the nature of our and their businesses, operations and investments, and general business, economic, financing, legal, regulatory, and other factors and conditions. New risk factors emerge from time to time and it is not possible for management to either predict all risk factors or assess the impact of any factor, or combination of factors, on our and our subsidiaries operations, results and financial condition. 

 

BFC has in the past incurred cash flow deficits at its parent company level and will rely on dividends from its subsidiaries in the future.

 

BFC is engaged in making investments in operating businesses. Historically, BFC, at its parent company level, has not had revenue generating operating activities and has incurred cash flow deficits. BFC has financed operating cash flow deficits with available working capital, issuances of equity or debt securities, and with dividends from its subsidiaries, which BFC has been dependent upon to fund its operations and investments. BFC historically received dividends on the shares of Benihana's stock that it owned. Benihana was acquired by Safflower in a cash merger during August 2012. While BFC received cash proceeds in exchange for its shares of Benihana's common stock in the transaction, BFC no longer holds an investment in Benihana and, accordingly, will not receive dividends in the future from Benihana. In addition, the payment of dividends by BBX Capital requires the declaration of such dividend by BBX Capital's board of directors, a majority of whom are independent under the listing standards of the -NYSE and, accordingly, such decision is not in BFC's control. Further, declaration of dividends by Bluegreen are subject to the approval of Bluegreen’s Board of Directors and certain of Bluegreen's credit facilities contain terms which may limit the payment of cash dividends without the lender's consent or waiver. Decisions with respect to dividends by BBX Capital and Bluegreen are generally based on, among other things, the applicable company's operating results, financial condition, cash flow and operating and cash needs. BFC expects to receive dividends from Woodbridge in order to fund its current and future operations and investments; however, dividends by Woodbridge are dependent on the receipt of dividends from Bluegreen and are subject to the approval of the boards of directors of both BFC and BBX Capital.  Dividends from Woodbridge may not be paid to BFC to the extent or when anticipated or at all.

 

Among other expenses that BFC incurs and payments it makes in the ordinary course of its business, BFC pays regular quarterly dividends of $187,500 on its 5% Cumulative Preferred Stock. In addition, former shareholders of Woodbridge Holdings Corporation ("WHC"), the predecessor by merger to Woodbridge, were entitled under the Florida Business Corporation Act (“FBCA”) to exercise appraisal rights in connection with the 2009 merger between BFC and WHC. Dissenting shareholders, who collectively held approximately 4.2 million shares of WHC's Class A Common Stock, exercised appraisal rights and requested payment for their shares. During July 2012, the presiding court in the appraisal rights proceeding determined the fair value of the dissenting shareholders' shares of WHC's Class A Common Stock to be $1.78 per share (or approximately $7.5 million in total) and awarded legal and other costs in favor of the dissenting shareholders. During March 2013, the court awarded legal fees and pre and post judgment interest to the dissenting shareholders totaling approximately $4.4 million, resulting in a total award of approximately $11.9 million (including the $7.5 million based on the $1.78 per share value determination). While Woodbridge is appealing the court's ruling with respect to the fair value determination and the award of legal fees and costs, the outcome of the appeal is uncertain. Further, regardless of the outcome of the appeal, Woodbridge will likely be required to make a significant payment (of up to approximately $11.9 million if the appeal is unsuccessful) to the dissenting shareholders. Additional information regarding this litigation is set forth in "Item 3 - Legal Proceedings."

 

If cash flow is not sufficient to fund BFC's liquidity needs or BFC otherwise determines it is advisable to do so, BFC might seek to liquidate some of its investments or seek to fund its operations with the proceeds of additional equity or debt financing. Such financing may not be available on commercially reasonable terms, if at all, and if BFC chooses to liquidate its investments, it may be forced to do so at depressed prices.

 

Adverse conditions and events where BFC’s investments are currently concentrated or in the industries in which its subsidiaries operate could adversely impact its results and future growth.

 

BBX Capital's real estate related operations, activities and investments are concentrated in the southeast United States.  Adverse economic conditions, natural disasters, including tropical storms and hurricanes, which are a permanent risk in the southeast United States, or adverse changes in laws or regulations applicable to BFC or the companies in which BFC holds investments have in the past adversely impacted and may in the future adversely impact BFC's operating results and financial condition.

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BFC and its subsidiaries may issue additional securities and incur additional indebtedness.

 

If BFC's cash flow is not sufficient to meet its liquidity needs and investment objectives or BFC's board of directors otherwise determines it to be appropriate, BFC may seek to raise funds in the future through the issuance of debt or equity securities. There is generally no restriction on BFC's ability to issue debt or equity securities which are pari passu or have a preference over its Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock, although the holders of BFC’s Class B Common Stock have special class voting rights under BFC’s Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation with respect to certain securities issuances and other actions affecting BFC’s Class B Common Stock. Any such issuance, including shares issued in connection with any investment or acquisition which BFC makes in the future, may be dilutive to BFC's shareholders. In addition, any securities issuances in the future by a subsidiary of BFC may dilute BFC's economic investment or voting interest in that company.

 

Further, BFC and its subsidiaries have in the past and may in the future incur significant amounts of debt. Any indebtedness could have several important effects, including, without limitation, that BFC or its subsidiaries, as applicable, may be required to use available cash for the payment of principal and interest due on its debt and that outstanding indebtedness and leverage will impact the liquidity of BFC or its subsidiaries, as applicable, and any negative changes in general economic and industry conditions will increase such impact.

 

BFC faces risks and uncertainties with respect to any acquisitions which it or its subsidiaries pursue in the future and there is no assurance that its investments will generate income or that BFC will exit any of its investments for a profit.

 

BFC has in the past focused and continues to focus on providing strategic support to its existing investments with a view to the improved performance of the organization as a whole. However, BFC may also seek to make opportunistic investments outside of its existing portfolio, including investments in real estate based opportunities and middle market operating businesses such as BFC’s investment in Renin. While BFC will seek investments and acquisitions primarily in companies that it believes will provide opportunities for growth, BFC may not be successful in identifying these opportunities. Investments or acquisitions that BFC does make, such as BFC’s investment in Renin, may not prove to be successful or even if successful may not generate income, or may generate income on an irregular basis or over a long time period, which would cause BFC's results of operations to vary significantly on a quarterly basis and from year to year. Acquisitions may expose BFC to additional risks and may have a material adverse effect on its results of operations. Any acquisition made may fail to accomplish the strategic objectives hoped or otherwise not perform as expected or adversely impact BFC's financial condition or operating results. In addition, BFC from time to time may consider disposition of its subsidiaries or investments and there is no assurance that any such disposition will generate a profit or otherwise be advantageous to BFC. Acquisitions and investments will also expose BFC, or increase BFC’s exposure in the case of acquisitions of or additional investments in its portfolio companies, to the risks of any business acquired or invested in.

 

In addition, there is significant competition for investments and acquisitions, which could increase the costs associated with the investment or acquisition.  Substantial costs are incurred in connection with the evaluation of potential acquisition and investment opportunities whether or not the acquisition or investment is ultimately consummated. Further, such investments or acquisitions may rely on additional debt or equity financing, which will subject BFC to the risks and uncertainties described in the preceding risk factor. If BFC requires additional financing in the future, the financing may not be available when needed or on favorable terms, if at all. Additionally, BFC does not intend to seek shareholder approval of any investments or acquisitions unless required by law or regulation or by BFC’s Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation or Bylaws.

 

Substantial sales of BFC’s Class A Common Stock or Class B Common Stock could adversely affect the market prices of such securities.

 

Substantial sales of BFC’s Class A Common Stock or Class B Common Stock, including sales of shares by controlling shareholders and management, or shares issued in connection with any investments or acquisition that BFC makes in the future, could adversely affect the market prices of such securities. Management has in the past and may in the future enter into 10 b5-1 plans pursuant to which they sell a significant number of shares into the open market.

 

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Alan B. Levan and John E. Abdo's control position may adversely affect the market price of BFC's Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock.

 

Alan B. Levan, the Chairman, Chief Executive Officer and President of BFC, John E. Abdo, the Vice Chairman of BFC, and their respective affiliates currently collectively beneficially own shares of BFC's Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock representing approximately 71% of the general voting power and approximately 23% of the total outstanding common stock of BFC. These shares consist of 12,907,051 shares, or approximately 17%, of BFC's Class A Common Stock and 6,521,278 shares, or approximately 87%, of BFC's Class B Common Stock. In addition, each has been granted restricted securities which vest over time.  Messrs. Levan and Abdo are parties to an agreement pursuant to which they have agreed to vote their shares of BFC's Class B Common Stock in favor of the election of the other to BFC's board of directors for so long as they are willing and able to serve as directors of BFC. Additionally, Mr. Abdo has agreed to vote the shares of BFC's Class B Common Stock he owns in the same manner that Mr. Levan votes his shares of BFC's Class B Common Stock. Mr. Abdo has also agreed, subject to certain exceptions, not to transfer certain of his shares of BFC's Class B Common Stock and to obtain the consent of Mr. Levan prior to the conversion of certain of his shares of BFC's Class B Common Stock into shares of BFC's Class A Common Stock. Because BFC's Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock vote as a single class on most matters, Messrs. Levan and Abdo effectively have the voting power to elect the members of BFC's board of directors and to control the outcome of any other vote of BFC's shareholders, except in those limited circumstances where Florida law mandates that the holders of BFC's Class A Common Stock vote as a separate class. Messrs. Levan and Abdo's control position may have an adverse effect on the market price of BFC's Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock. In addition, their interests may conflict with the interests of BFC's other shareholders.

 

The loss of the services of BFC's key management and personnel could adversely affect its business and the businesses of its subsidiaries.

 

BFC's ability to successfully implement its business strategy will depend on its ability to attract and retain experienced and knowledgeable management and other professional staff. BFC may not be successful in attracting and retaining key management personnel.  During January 2012, the SEC filed a lawsuit against BBX Capital and its Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Alan B. Levan, alleging violations of securities laws. On December 15, 2014, after a six-week trial, the jury found in favor of BBX Capital and Alan B. Levan with respect to the disclosures made during an April 2007 earnings conference call and in BBX Capital’s quarterly reports on Form 10-Q for the 2007 first and second quarters, but found that they had engaged in an act of fraud or deceit toward shareholders or prospective investors by making materially false statements knowingly or with severe recklessness (1) with respect to three statements in the July 25, 2007 conference call which were the subject of a pretrial summary judgement order, and (2) in their decision to sell certain loans in the fourth quarter of 2007 and failing to classify the loans as held-for sale in the 2007 Annual Report on Form 10-K.  The jury also found that Mr. Levan made or caused to be made false statements to the independent accountants regarding the held for sale issue.  The SEC has filed a motion for a final judgment: (i) permanently barring Alan B. Levan from serving as an officer or director of any SEC reporting company; (ii) imposing civil penalties of $5.2 million against BBX Capital and $1.56 million against Alan B. Levan; and (iii) permanently restraining BBX Capital and Alan B. Levan from violating securities laws.  BBX Capital believes the claims to be without merit, continues to vigorously defend the action and intends to appeal any judgment entered to the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals. Additional information regarding this litigation is set forth in “Item 3 – Legal Proceedings.”  Further, if the findings of fraud by the Company and/or Mr. Levan are upheld, this may adversely affect the Company's assessment of internal controls over financial reporting.  As described above, Mr. Levan is also the Chairman, Chief Executive Officer and President of BFC and, together with John E. Abdo, may be deemed to control BFC by virtue of their collective ownership interest in BFC's Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock. In the event Mr. Levan is restricted from serving, or is otherwise unable to serve, as an executive officer and/or director of BFC or any of its public company subsidiaries, including BBX Capital, BFC and its business, as well as the businesses of its subsidiaries, may be adversely impacted.

 

Provisions in BFC's Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation and Bylaws, as well as BFC's shareholder rights plan, may make it difficult for a third party to acquire BFC and could impact the price of BFC's Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock.

 

BFC's Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation and Bylaws contain provisions that could delay, defer or prevent a change of control of BFC or its management. These provisions could make it more difficult for shareholders to elect directors and take other corporate actions. As a result, these provisions could limit the price that investors are willing to pay in the future for shares of BFC's Class A Common Stock or Class B Common Stock. These provisions include:

 

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·

the provisions in BFC's Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation regarding the special voting rights of BFC's Class B Common Stock;

 

·

subject to the special class voting rights of holders of BFC’s Class B Common Stock under certain circumstances, the authority of BFC's board of directors to issue additional shares of common or preferred stock and to fix the relative rights and preferences of the preferred stock without additional shareholder approval; and

 

·

advance notice procedures to be complied with by shareholders in order to make shareholder proposals or nominate directors.

 

In addition, BFC currently has in place a shareholder rights plan which is designed to preserve certain tax benefits available to BFC. However, because the rights plan provides a deterrent to investors from acquiring a 5% or greater ownership interest in BFC's Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock, it may have an anti-takeover effect.

 

BBX Capital's Restated Articles of Incorporation and Amended and Restated Bylaws contain similar provisions as those described above. See "Risks Related to BBX Capital.”

 

Dividends and distributions from BFC’s subsidiaries to their respective parent companies may be subject to claims in the future from creditors of the subsidiary.

 

Subsidiaries have in the past and may in the future make dividends or distributions to their parent companies. During 2013 and 2014, Bluegreen paid dividends totaling $47 million and $71.5 million, respectively, to its parent company, Woodbridge, and Woodbridge paid dividends totaling $23.9 million and $37.3 million, respectively,  to BFC and $20.4 million and $31.8 million, respectively, to BBX Capital.  Dividend payments and other distributions by a subsidiary to its parent company may, in certain circumstances, be subject to claims made by creditors of the subsidiary which made the payment or distribution. Any such claim, if successful, may have a material adverse impact on the financial condition of the parent company against which the claim was brought.

 

There are inherent uncertainties involved in estimates, judgments and assumptions used in the preparation of financial statements in accordance with GAAP. Any changes in estimates, judgments and assumptions used could have a material adverse effect on BFC’s financial position and operating results.

 

The consolidated financial statements included in the periodic reports BFC files with the SEC, including this Annual Report on Form 10-K, are prepared in accordance with GAAP. The preparation of financial statements in accordance with GAAP involves making estimates, judgments and assumptions that affect reported amounts of assets (including goodwill and other intangible assets), liabilities and related reserves, revenues, expenses and income. This includes estimates, judgments and assumptions for assessing the amortization/accretion of purchase accounting fair value differences and the future value of goodwill and other intangible assets pursuant to applicable accounting guidance. BFC bases its estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that BFC believes to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. However, estimates, judgments and assumptions are inherently subject to change in the future. As a result, BFC's estimates, judgments and assumptions may prove to be incorrect and BFC's actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions. If any estimates, judgments or assumptions change in the future, or BFC's actual results differ from BFC's estimates or assumptions, BFC may be required to record additional expenses or impairment charges, which would be recorded as a charge against its earnings and could have a material adverse impact on its financial condition and operating results.

 

BFC’s investment in BBX Capital is subject to equity pricing risks.

 

BBX Capital's Class A Common Stock is currently listed for trading on the NYSE. Because BBX Capital is consolidated in BFC's financial statements, the decline in the market price of BBX Capital's Class A Common Stock would not impact BFC's consolidated financial statements. However, the market price of BFC's Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock, which is important to its valuation and ability to obtain equity or debt financing, would likely be adversely affected by a decline in the market price of BBX Capital's Class A Common Stock. The market price of BBX Capital's Class A Common Stock is subject to a number of factors, many of which may he beyond the control of BBX Capital, including general economic trends and conditions. In addition, BFC's control position with respect to BBX Capital may have an adverse effect on the market price of BBX Capital's Class A. Common Stock.

 

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Certain members of BFC’s board of directors and certain of BFC's executive officers are also directors and executive officers of BBX Capital and directors of Bluegreen.

 

Alan B. Levan, BFC's Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, and John E. Abdo, BFC's Vice Chairman, are also directors and executive officers of BBX Capital and directors of Bluegreen. None of these individuals is obligated to allocate a specific amount of time to the management of BFC, and they may devote more time and attention to the operations of BFC's affiliates than they devote directly to BFC's operations. Each of Jarett S. Levan and Seth M. Wise, who serve as Executive Vice Presidents of BFC and as members of its board of directors, is an executive officer of BBX Capital, and Mr. Jarett Levan is also a member of BBX Capital's board of directors. Further, John K. Grelle has served as Chief Financial Officer of both BFC and BBX Capital and, upon his previously announced retirement following the filing of this report, Raymond S. Lopez will succeed Mr. Grelle as Chief Financial Officer of both BFC and BBX Capital.

 

Pending legal proceedings and the impact of any finding of liability or damages could adversely impact BFC and its financial condition and operating results.

 

BFC and its subsidiaries are subject to the pending legal proceedings described in "Item 3 - Legal Proceedings," including, but not limited to, the above-described appraisal rights litigation arising from the 2009 merger between BFC and Woodbridge Holdings Corporation, the pending class action lawsuits relating to Woodbridge’s 2013 acquisition of Bluegreen, and the SEC action against BBX Capital and its Chairman, as well as proceedings that may arise from time to time. While BFC believes that the parties to these proceedings have meritorious defenses in the pending legal actions, the ultimate outcomes of these matters are uncertain. Judgments against, or damages, fines or penalties imposed on, BFC, its subsidiaries or its officers or directors in these actions, as well as actions which BFC and its subsidiaries may face in the future, may have a material adverse impact on BFC's operating results and financial condition.

 

BFC and its subsidiaries are subject to environmental laws related to their real estate activities and the cost of compliance could adversely affect the businesses of BFC and its subsidiaries.

 

As current or previous owners or operators of real property, BFC and its subsidiaries may be liable under federal, state and local environmental laws, ordinances and regulations for the costs of removal or remediation of hazardous or toxic substances on, under or in the property. These laws often impose liability whether or not BFC or its subsidiaries knew of, or was responsible for, the presence of such hazardous or toxic substances. The cost of investigating, remediating or removing such hazardous or toxic substances may be substantial.

 

 

 

 

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RISKS RELATED TO BLUEGREEN

 

Bluegreen is subject to various risks and uncertainties relating to or arising out of the nature of its business and general business, economic, financing, legal and other factors or conditions that may affect Bluegreen. Moreover, Bluegreen operates in a very competitive, highly regulated and rapidly changing environment.  New risk factors emerge from time to time and it is not possible for management to either predict all risk factors, or assess the impact of all risk factors on Bluegreen’s business or the extent to which any factor, or combination of factors, may affect Bluegreen’s business. 

 

Bluegreen’s business and operations, including its ability to market VOIs, is subject to risks related to general economic conditions and the availability of financing.

 

Bluegreen’s business is subject to risks related to general economic and industry conditions and trends, and Bluegreen’s results, operations and financial condition may be adversely affected by unfavorable general economic and industry conditions, including high unemployment rates and job insecurity, declines in discretionary spending, declines in real estate values and geopolitical conflicts or, if financing for Bluegreen or for its customers is unavailable or if changes in general economic conditions or other factors adversely affect Bluegreen’s customers’ ability to pay amounts owed under notes receivable. Further, adverse changes affecting the vacation ownership industry, such as an oversupply of vacation ownership units, a reduction in demand for such units, changes in travel, demographic and vacation patterns, changes in governmental regulation of the industry, imposition of increased taxes by governmental authorities, the declaration of bankruptcy and/or credit defaults by other vacation ownership companies and negative publicity for the industry, could also have a material adverse effect on Bluegreen’s business. In addition, Bluegreen's operations and results may be negatively impacted if Bluegreen is unable to update its business strategy over time and from time to time in response to changing market conditions and economic indicators.

 

The vacation ownership and hospitality industries are highly competitive, and Bluegreen may not be able to compete successfully.

 

Bluegreen competes with various high profile and well-established operators, many of which have greater liquidity and financial resources than Bluegreen. Many of the world's most recognized lodging, hospitality and entertainment companies develop and sell VOIs in resort properties. Bluegreen also competes with numerous smaller owners and operators of vacation ownership resorts. Bluegreen's ability to remain competitive and to attract and retain customers depends on its customers' satisfaction with its products and services as well as on distinguishing the quality, value, and efficiency of its products and services from those offered by its competitors. Customer dissatisfaction with experiences at its resorts or otherwise as a member of the Bluegreen Vacation Club, including due to an inability to use points for desired stays, could result in negative publicity and/or a decrease in sales, or otherwise adversely impact Bluegreen's ability to successfully compete in the vacation ownership and hospitality industries. Bluegreen may not be able to timely and sufficiently identify and remediate the cause of customer dissatisfaction. Any of these events could materially and adversely impact Bluegreen's operating results and financial condition.

 

Bluegreen would incur substantial losses and Bluegreen’s liquidity position could be adversely impacted if the customers to whom Bluegreen provides financing default on their obligations.

 

Prior to December 15, 2008, Bluegreen did not perform credit checks on the purchasers of its VOIs in connection with Bluegreen’s financing of their purchases. Effective December 15, 2008, Bluegreen implemented a FICO® score-based credit underwriting program.  Bluegreen enhanced this credit underwriting program starting in January 2010. While Bluegreen’s loan portfolio originated after December 15, 2008 has to date experienced defaults at a lower rate than loans originated prior to that date, Bluegreen’s FICO® score-based underwriting standards may not continue to result in decreased default rates or otherwise result in the improved performance of Bluegreen’s notes receivable. Adverse conditions in the mortgage industry, including credit availability, borrowers’ financial profiles, prepayment rates and other factors, including those outside Bluegreen’s control may increase the default rates Bluegreen experiences or otherwise negatively impact the performance of its notes receivable. Although in many cases Bluegreen may have recourse against a buyer for the unpaid purchase price, certain states have laws that limit Bluegreen’s ability to recover personal judgments against customers who have defaulted on their loans or the cost of doing so may not be justified. Historically, Bluegreen has generally not pursued such recourse against its customers. In the case of Bluegreen’s notes receivable secured by VOIs, if Bluegreen is unable to collect the defaulted amount due, Bluegreen traditionally has terminated the customer’s interest in the Bluegreen Vacation Club and then remarketed the recovered VOI. Irrespective of Bluegreen’s remedy in the event of a default, Bluegreen cannot recover the marketing, selling and administrative costs associated with the original sale and such costs generally exceed the cash received by Bluegreen

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from the buyer at the time of the sale. In addition, Bluegreen will need to incur such costs again in order to resell the VOI.  If default rates for Bluegreen’s borrowers remain at current levels or increase, Bluegreen may be required to increase its provision for credit losses. In addition, it may cause buyers of, or lenders whose loans are secured by, Bluegreen’s VOI notes receivable to reduce the amount of availability or advance rates under receivables purchase and credit facilities, or to increase the interest costs associated with such facilities. In such an event, the cost of financing may increase and Bluegreen may not be able to secure replacement or alternative financing on terms acceptable to Bluegreen, if at all, which would adversely affect Bluegreen’s earnings, financial position and liquidity.

 

Under the terms of Bluegreen’s pledged and receivable sale facilities, Bluegreen may be required, under certain circumstances, to replace receivables or to pay down the loan to within permitted loan-to-value ratios. Additionally, the terms of Bluegreen’s securitization transactions require Bluegreen to repurchase or replace loans if Bluegreen breaches any of the representations and warranties Bluegreen made at the time Bluegreen sold the receivables.  These agreements also often include provisions that in the event of defaults or delinquencies by customers in excess of stated thresholds, or if other performance thresholds are not met, will require substantially all of Bluegreen’s cash flow from its retained interest in the receivable portfolios sold to be paid to the parties who purchased the receivables from Bluegreen.

 

While Bluegreen has attempted to restructure its business to reduce its need for and reliance on financing for liquidity in the short term, there is no assurance that such restructuring will be successful or that Bluegreen’s business and profitability will not otherwise continue to depend on its ability to obtain financing, which may not be available on favorable terms, or at all. 

 

Bluegreen offers financing of up to 90% of the purchase price to purchasers of Bluegreen’s VOIs. However, Bluegreen incurs selling, marketing and administrative cash expenditures prior to and concurrent with the sale. These costs generally exceed the down payment Bluegreen receives at the time of the sale. Accordingly, Bluegreen’s ability to borrow against or sell its notes receivable has historically been a critical factor in Bluegreen’s continued liquidity, and Bluegreen therefore has depended on funds from its credit facilities and securitization transactions to finance its operations. The disruption in the credit markets, which began in 2007, made obtaining additional and replacement external sources of liquidity more difficult and more costly. The number of banks and other finance companies willing to provide “warehouse” lines of credit for VOI receivables decreased, and the term securitization market was unavailable for an extended period of time. If Bluegreen’s pledged receivables facilities terminate or expire and Bluegreen is unable to extend them or replace them with comparable facilities, or if Bluegreen is unable to continue to participate in securitization-type transactions and “warehouse” facilities on acceptable terms, Bluegreen’s liquidity, cash flow and profitability would be materially and adversely affected.

 

In addition, financing for real estate acquisition and development and the capital markets for corporate debt have been limited. In response to these conditions, during 2008, Bluegreen adopted initiatives, which included limiting sales and encouraging higher down payments on sales, in an attempt to conserve cash.  Bluegreen also increased its focus on expanding its fee-based service business. However, there is no assurance that these initiatives will enhance its financial position or otherwise be successful in the long run. If these initiatives do not have their intended results, Bluegreen’s financial condition may be materially and adversely impacted.

 

Notwithstanding the initiatives implemented by Bluegreen to improve its cash position, Bluegreen anticipates that it will continue to seek and use external sources of liquidity, including funds that Bluegreen obtains pursuant to additional borrowings under its existing credit facilities, under credit facilities that Bluegreen may obtain in the future, under securitizations in which Bluegreen may participate in the future or pursuant to other borrowing arrangements, to:

 

·

support Bluegreen’s operations and pay dividends;

·

finance the acquisition and development of VOI inventory or property and equipment;

·

finance a substantial percentage of Bluegreen’s sales; and

·

satisfy Bluegreen’s debt and other obligations.

 

Bluegreen’s ability to service or to refinance its indebtedness or to obtain additional financing (including its ability to consummate future term securitizations) depends on the credit markets and on Bluegreen’s future performance, which is subject to a number of factors, including the success of Bluegreen’s business, results of operations, leverage, financial condition and business prospects, prevailing interest rates, general economic conditions, the performance of Bluegreen’s receivables portfolio, and perceptions about the vacation ownership and real estate industries. Further, reputational and other risks to both the lender and to Bluegreen associated with the 2007 bankruptcy of Levitt and Sons, LLC, a former wholly owned homebuilding subsidiary of Woodbridge, and the jury verdict currently subject to post-trial motions and appeal in the litigation brought by the SEC against BBX Capital and its Chairman, Alan B. Levan, who is also Chairman of Bluegreen’s board of directors and Chairman, Chief Executive Officer and President of BFC, may be considered by lenders in connection with both making and renewing extensions of credit.

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As of December 31, 2014, Bluegreen had $24.4 million of indebtedness scheduled to become due during 2015. Historically, much of Bluegreen’s debt has been renewed or refinanced in the ordinary course of business. However, Bluegreen may not in the future be able to obtain sufficient external sources of liquidity on attractive terms, or at all, or otherwise renew, extend or refinance all or any portion of its outstanding debt. Any of these occurrences may have a material and adverse impact on Bluegreen’s liquidity and financial condition.

 

Bluegreen's indebtedness may impact its financial condition and results of operations, and the terms of Bluegreen's indebtedness may limit its activities.

 

Bluegreen's level of debt and debt service requirements has several important effects on Bluegreen's operations. Significant debt service cash requirements reduce the funds available for operations and future business opportunities and increase Bluegreen's vulnerability to adverse economic and industry conditions, as well as conditions in the credit markets generally. In addition, Bluegreen's leverage position increases its vulnerability to economic and competitive pressures and may limit funds available for acquisitions, working capital, capital expenditures, dividends, and other general corporate purposes. Further, the financial covenants and other restrictions contained in indentures, credit agreements and other agreements relating to Bluegreen's indebtedness require Bluegreen to meet certain financial tests and restrict Bluegreen's ability to, among other things, pay dividends, borrow additional funds, dispose of assets or make investments. If Bluegreen fails to comply with the terms of its debt instruments, such debt may become due and payable immediately, which would have a material adverse impact on Bluegreen's cash position and financial condition. Significant resources may be required to monitor Bluegreen's compliance with its debt instruments (from a quantitative and qualitative perspective), and such monitoring efforts may not be effective in all cases.

 

The ratings of third-party rating agencies could adversely impact Bluegreen’s ability to obtain, renew or extend credit facilities, or otherwise raise funds.

 

Rating agencies from time to time review prior corporate and specific transaction ratings in light of tightened ratings criteria. In June 2013, Standard & Poor’s Rating Services raised Bluegreen’s credit rating to a ‘B’ from a ‘B-’ with a “stable” outlook. Bluegreen’s credit rating is also based, in part, on rating agencies’ speculation about Bluegreen’s potential future debt and dividend levels.  If rating agencies were to downgrade Bluegreen’s corporate credit ratings, Bluegreen’s ability to raise funds on favorable terms, or at all, and Bluegreen’s liquidity, financial condition and results of operations could be adversely impacted. In addition, if rating agencies downgraded their original ratings on certain bond classes in Bluegreen’s securitizations, holders of such bonds may be required to sell bonds in the marketplace, and such sales could occur at a discount, which could impact the perceived value of the bonds and Bluegreen’s ability to sell future bonds on favorable terms or at all. While Bluegreen is not currently aware of any reasonably likely downgrades to its corporate credit rating or the ratings of bond classes in its securitizations, such ratings changes can occur without advance notice.

 

Bluegreen’s future success depends on its ability to market its products and services successfully and efficiently and Bluegreen’s marketing expenses may increase.

 

Bluegreen competes for customers with hotel and resort properties and other vacation ownership resorts. The identification of sales prospects and leads, and the marketing of Bluegreen’s products and services to them are essential to its success.  Bluegreen has incurred and will continue to incur the expenses associated with marketing programs in advance of closing sales to the leads that Bluegreen identifies. If Bluegreen’s lead identification and marketing efforts do not yield enough leads or Bluegreen is unable to successfully convert sales leads to sales, Bluegreen may be unable to recover the expense of its marketing programs and systems and its business, operating results and financial conditions would be adversely affected. In addition, sales to existing owners, typically carry a relatively lower marketing cost. Bluegreen is currently focusing and has increased its marketing efforts on selling to new customers, which has increased and is expected to continue to increase Bluegreen’s sales and marketing expenses as compared to prior periods where marketing efforts were focused primarily on sales to existing customers.  If Bluegreen is not successful in offsetting the cost increase with greater sales revenue, Bluegreen’s operating results and financial condition would be adversely impacted by such change. In addition, Bluegreen's marketing efforts are subject to the risk of changing consumer behavior. Changes in consumer behavior may adversely impact the effectiveness of marketing efforts and strategies which Bluegreen has in place, and Bluegreen may not be able to timely respond to such changes.

 

Bluegreen generates a significant portion of its new sales prospects and leads through its arrangements with various third parties, including Bass Pro and Choice Hotels.  If these arrangements do not generate a sufficient number of leads or are terminated or limited and not replaced by other sources of sales prospects and leads, Bluegreen may not be able to maintain its current sales levels or successfully market and sell its products and services to new customers at

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anticipated levels or at levels required in order to offset the increased costs associated with its marketing efforts. This would adversely impact Bluegreen’s operating results and financial condition.

 

Bluegreen may not be successful in increasing or expanding its capital-light business relationships, and its capital-light activities, including fee based, sales and marketing, just-in-time VOI arrangements, and Secondary Market Sales activities, and such activities may not be profitable, which may have an adverse impact on Bluegreen’s results of operations and financial condition.

 

In July 2009, Bluegreen began offering fee-based marketing, sales, resort management and other services to third-party developers. During 2013 and 2014, Bluegreen continued to expand its capital-light business strategy, which Bluegreen believes enables it to leverage its expertise in sales and marketing, resort management, mortgage servicing, construction management and title services.  Bluegreen currently intends for its capital-light business activities to become an increasing portion of its business over time as such activities generally produce positive cash flow and typically require less capital investment than Bluegreen’s traditional vacation ownership business. Bluegreen has attempted to structure these activities to cover its costs and generate a profit. However, Bluegreen’s capital-light business strategy remains relatively new and Bluegreen has limited experience in its operation. In addition, while most of Bluegreen’s fee-based marketing and sales services do not require Bluegreen to use its receivable credit facility capacity, Bluegreen’s clients typically have to maintain their own receivable-backed credit facilities. Should Bluegreen’s clients not be able to maintain their facilities, Bluegreen’s fee based marketing and sales business could be materially adversely impacted. Sales of third party developers' VOIs must generate sufficient cash to comply with the terms of the developers' financing obligations as well as to pay the fees or commissions due Bluegreen. The third party developers may not be able to obtain or maintain financing necessary for its operations, which could impact Bluegreen's ability to sell the developers' inventory. While Bluegreen could attempt to structure other arrangements, including just-in-time arrangements, where Bluegreen would utilize its receivable credit facilities in order to provide fee-based marketing and sales services, this would reduce the credit otherwise available to Bluegreen. Bluegreen commenced its capital-light activities largely during the recession in response to poor economic conditions and Bluegreen’s fee-based and other capital-light business activities in the future may be adversely impacted by changes in economic conditions.  While Bluegreen performs fee-based sales and marketing services, Bluegreen sells VOIs in a resort developed by a third party as an interest in the Bluegreen Vacation Club. This subjects Bluegreen to a number of risks typically associated with selling products developed by others under its own brand name, including litigation risks. Additionally, demand for the third party resorts may be below Bluegreen’s expectations and the third party developers may not satisfy their obligations.

 

Bluegreen is currently also selling VOI inventory which requires low levels of capital deployment whereby Bluegreen acquires VOI inventory from its resorts’ POAs on a non-committed basis, in close proximity to the timing of when Bluegreen intends to sell such VOIs. VOIs purchased from POAs are typically obtained by the POAs, through foreclosure in connection with maintenance fee defaults and are generally acquired by Bluegreen at a significant discount. While Bluegreen intends to increase its Secondary Market Sales efforts in the future, Bluegreen may not be successful in doing so, and these efforts may not result in Bluegreen achieving anticipated improved results.

 

Bluegreen’s results of operations and financial condition may be materially and adversely impacted if Bluegreen does not continue to participate in exchange networks and other strategic alliances with third parties or if Bluegreen’s customers are not satisfied with the networks in which Bluegreen participates or Bluegreen’s strategic alliances.

 

Bluegreen believes that its participation in exchange networks and other strategic alliances and its Traveler Plus™ program make ownership of Bluegreen VOIs more attractive by providing owners with the ability to take advantage of vacation experiences in addition to stays at Bluegreen resorts.  A VOI owner’s participation in the RCI exchange network allows an owner to exchange their annual VOI for occupancy at over 4,500 participating resorts, based upon availability and the payment of a variable exchange fee. During 2014, approximately 8% of Bluegreen owners utilized the RCI exchange network for an exchange of two or more nights.  Bluegreen also has strategic alliance agreements with Choice Hotels pursuant to which, subject to payments and conditions, certain of Bluegreen’s resorts have been branded as part of Choice Hotels’ Ascend Resort Collection® and Ascend Hotel Collection®. In addition, Bluegreen’s Traveler Plus™ members have the ability to convert their Bluegreen Vacation Club points into Choice Privileges® points which can be used for stays at participating Choice Hotels or may convert their Bluegreen Vacation Club points to stay at Ascend Collection® hotels. In addition, all Bluegreen Vacation Club members may convert their Bluegreen Vacation Club points for Choice Privileges® points for a fee. Bluegreen Vacation Club members, for an additional annual fee, may also participate in the Bluegreen Traveler Plus™ program which allows them to use their points for a variety of hotel stays, RV site stays within the “Coast to Coast" network, or various cruise vacations.  Also, for a nominal fee, Bluegreen Vacation Club owners who purchased or upgraded their VOI since July 1, 2007 and participate in the Bluegreen Traveler Plus™ program, have the ability to use their vacation points to reserve accommodations in 43 additional resort locations through Direct Exchange.  Bluegreen may not be able or desire to continue to participate

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in the RCI or Direct Exchange networks at some point in the future. In addition, these networks and Bluegreen’s Traveler Plus™ program may not continue to operate effectively, and Bluegreen’s customers may not continue to be satisfied with them. Further, Bluegreen’s relationship with Choice Hotels may not be well received by Bluegreen’s customers or otherwise result in the benefits Bluegreen expects to derive from the relationship.  In addition, Bluegreen may not be successful in identifying or entering into new strategic relationships in the future.  If any of these events should occur, Bluegreen’s results of operations and financial condition may be materially and adversely impacted.

 

The resale market for VOIs could adversely affect Bluegreen’s business.

 

Based on Bluegreen’s experience at its resorts and at destination resorts owned by third parties, Bluegreen believes that resales of VOIs in the secondary market generally are made at net sales prices below the original customer purchase prices. The relatively lower sales prices are partly attributable to the high marketing and sales costs associated with the initial sales of such VOIs. Accordingly, the initial purchase of a VOI may be less attractive to prospective buyers and Bluegreen competes with buyers who seek to resell their VOIs. While VOI resale clearing houses or brokers currently do not have a material impact on Bluegreen’s business the availability of resale VOIs at lower prices, particularly if an organized and liquid secondary market develops, could adversely affect Bluegreen sales prices and the number of sales Bluegreen can close, which in turn would adversely affect Bluegreen’s business and results of operations.

 

Bluegreen is subject to the risks of the real estate market and the risks associated with real estate development, including a decline in real estate values and a deterioration of other conditions relating to the real estate market and real estate development.

 

Real estate markets are cyclical in nature and highly sensitive to changes in national and regional economic conditions, including:

 

·

levels of unemployment;

·

levels of discretionary disposable income;

·

levels of consumer confidence;

·

the availability of financing;

·

overbuilding or decreases in demand;

·

interest rates; and

·

federal, state and local taxation methods.

 

A deterioration in general economic conditions or continued adverse conditions in the real estate market would have a material adverse effect on Bluegreen’s business.

 

To the extent Bluegreen decides to acquire more real estate inventory in the future, the availability of land for development of resort properties at favorable prices at that time will be critical to Bluegreen’s profitability and the ability to cover its significant selling, general and administrative expenses, cost of capital and other expenses. If Bluegreen is unable to acquire such land or resort properties at a favorable cost, Bluegreen’s results of operations may be materially, adversely impacted. While Bluegreen believes that the property Bluegreen has purchased at its adjusted carrying amounts will generate appropriate margins, land prices remain significantly below historical levels, and the projects  Bluegreen acquired prior to or during the recent economic downturn may have been purchased at higher price levels than available in the current market.

 

The profitability of Bluegreen’s real estate development activities is also impacted by the cost of construction materials and services. Should the cost of construction materials and services rise, the ultimate cost of Bluegreen’s future resorts inventory when developed could increase and have a material, adverse impact on Bluegreen’s results of operations.

 

Adverse outcomes in legal or other regulatory proceedings, including claims for development-related defects, could adversely affect Bluegreen’s financial condition and operating results.

 

In the ordinary course of business, Bluegreen is subject to litigation, legal and regulatory proceedings, which result in significant expenses relating to legal and other professional fees. In addition, litigation is inherently uncertain, and adverse outcomes in the litigation and other proceedings to which Bluegreen is subject could adversely affect its financial condition and operating results.

 

During January 2012, the SEC filed a civil lawsuit in federal court (the "Action"), against BBX Capital and its Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Alan B. Levan (who is also Chairman of BFC and, since May 2002, non-executive Chairman of Bluegreen). The Action, which does not involve Bluegreen and relates to matters that

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allegedly occurred while BBX Capital was a bank holding company that owned BankAtlantic.  The Action alleged that BBX Capital and Mr. Levan violated securities laws by not timely disclosing known adverse trends in BankAtlantic's commercial real estate loans, selectively disclosing problem loans and engaging in improper accounting treatment of certain specific loans which may have resulted in a material understatement of its net loss in BBX Capital's Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2007. Further, the Action alleged that BBX Capital Chairman intentionally misled investors in related earnings calls.  In addition to seeking a finding of securities violations, injunctive relief and monetary penalties, the Action sought an officer and director bar with respect to Mr. Levan was also sought in the Action.   Following a six week trial in federal court in Miami, on December 15, 2014, the jury found in favor of BBX Capital and Alan B. Levan with respect to the disclosures made during an April 2007 earnings conference call and in BBX Capital’s quarterly reports on Form 10-Q for the 2007 first and second quarters, but found that they had engaged in an act of fraud or deceit toward shareholders or prospective investors by making materially false statements knowingly or with severe recklessness (1) with respect to three statements in the July 25, 2007 conference call referenced above, and (2) in their decision to sell certain loans in the fourth quarter of 2007 and failing to classify the loans as held-for sale in the 2007 Annual Report on Form 10-K.  The jury also found that Mr. Levan made or caused to be made false statements to the independent accountants regarding the held for sale issue. On March 10, 2015, motions to enter judgment in favor of BBX Capital and Mr. Levan were denied. BBX Capital has indicated that it and Mr. Levan will appeal the issues to the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals.  Until the resolution of such motions and appeals, it is anticipated that Mr. Levan will continue in his positions at BBX Capital, BFC and Bluegreen.

 

Bluegreen engages third-party contractors to construct its resorts.  Bluegreen also historically engaged third-party contractors to develop the communities within its former Bluegreen Communities business. However, Bluegreen’s customers may assert claims against Bluegreen for construction defects or other perceived development defects, including, without limitation, structural integrity, the presence of mold as a result of leaks or other defects, water intrusion, asbestos, electrical issues, plumbing issues, road construction, water and sewer defects and defects in the engineering of amenities. In addition, certain state and local laws may impose liability on property developers with respect to development defects discovered in the future.  Bluegreen could have to accrue a significant portion of the cost to repair such defects in the quarter when such defects arise or when the repair costs are reasonably estimable. In addition, liabilities related to Bluegreen Communities that were not assumed by Southstar in connection with its purchase of substantially all of the assets which comprised Bluegreen Communities on May 4, 2012, including those relating to Bluegreen Communities’ operations prior to the closing of the transaction, remain Bluegreen’s responsibility. See “Item 3 - Legal Proceedings” for a description of currently pending legal matters with respect to Bluegreen. Costs associated with litigation, including claims for development-related defects, and the outcomes thereof could adversely affect Bluegreen’s liquidity, financial condition and operating results.

 

Bluegreen may be adversely affected by extensive federal, state and local laws and regulations and changes in applicable laws and regulations, including with respect to the imposition of additional taxes on operations. In addition, results of audits of Bluegreen’s tax returns or those of Bluegreen’s subsidiaries may have a material and adverse impact on Bluegreen’s financial condition.

 

The federal government and the states and local jurisdictions in which Bluegreen operates have enacted extensive regulations that affect the manner in which Bluegreen markets and sells VOIs and conducts its other business operations. In addition, many states have adopted specific laws and regulations regarding the sale of VOIs. Many states, including Florida and South Carolina, where certain of Bluegreen resorts are located, extensively regulate the creation and management of timeshare resorts, the marketing and sale of timeshare properties, the escrow of purchaser funds prior to the completion of construction and closing, the content and use of advertising materials and promotional offers, the delivery of an offering memorandum and the creation and operation of exchange programs and multi-site timeshare plan reservation systems. Moreover, with regard to sales conducted in South Carolina, the closing of real estate and mortgage loan transactions must be conducted under the supervision of an attorney licensed in South Carolina and otherwise in accordance with South Carolina’s Time Sharing Transaction Procedures Act. Most states also have other laws that regulate Bluegreen’s activities, such as timeshare project registration laws, real estate licensure laws, mortgage licensure laws, sellers of travel licensure laws, anti-fraud laws, consumer protection laws, telemarketing laws, prize, gift and sweepstakes laws, and consumer credit laws. Bluegreen's management of, and dealings with, POAs, including Bluegreen's purchase of defaulted inventory from POAs in connection with its Secondary Market Sales, is also subject to state laws and resort rules and regulations, including those with respect to the establishment of budgets and expenditures, rule-making, and the imposition of maintenance assessments.

 

Bluegreen currently is authorized to market and sell VOIs in all locations at which its marketing and sales are currently conducted. If Bluegreen’s agents or employees violate applicable regulations or licensing requirements, their acts or omissions could cause the states where the violations occurred to revoke or refuse to renew Bluegreen’s licenses, render Bluegreen’s sales contracts void or voidable, or impose fines on Bluegreen based on past activities.

 

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Further, the Consumer Finance Protection Bureau, created under the Dodd-Frank Act, has emphasized new regulatory focus on areas of Bluegreen’s business such as consumer mortgage servicing and debt collection, credit reporting and consumer financial disclosures, all of which affect the manner in which Bluegreen provides purchase money financing to the purchasers of its VOIs and conducts its lending and loan servicing operations.

 

In addition, the federal government and the states and local jurisdictions in which Bluegreen conducts business have generally enacted extensive regulations relating to direct marketing and telemarketing, including the federal government’s national “Do Not Call” list, and the making of marketing and related calls to cell phone users, a significant development in light of cell phone usage rapidly becoming the primary method of communication. The regulations have impacted Bluegreen’s marketing of VOIs, and Bluegreen has taken steps in an attempt to decrease its dependence on restricted calls. However, these steps have increased and are expected to continue to increase Bluegreen’s marketing costs.  Bluegreen cannot predict the impact that these legislative initiatives or any other legislative measures that may be proposed or enacted in the future may have on Bluegreen’s marketing strategies and results. Further, from time to time, complaints are filed against Bluegreen by individuals claiming that they received calls in violation of applicable regulations.

 

Currently, most states have taxed VOIs as real estate, imposing property taxes that are billed to the respective POAs that maintain the related resorts and have not sought to impose sales tax upon the sale of the VOI or accommodations tax upon the use of the VOI. From time to time, however, various states have attempted to promulgate new laws or apply existing laws impacting the taxation of VOIs to require that sales or accommodations taxes be collected. Should new state or local laws be implemented or interpreted to impose sales or accommodations taxes on VOIs, Bluegreen’s business could be materially adversely affected.

 

From time to time, consumers file complaints against Bluegreen in the ordinary course of Bluegreen’s business.  Bluegreen could be required to incur significant costs to resolve these complaints or enter into consents with regulators regarding its activities. Bluegreen may not remain in material compliance with all applicable federal, state and local laws and regulations, and violations of applicable laws may have adverse implications on Bluegreen, including negative public relations, potential litigation and regulatory sanctions. The expense, negative publicity and potential sanctions associated with any failure to comply with applicable laws or regulations could have a material adverse effect on Bluegreen’s results of operations, liquidity or financial position.

 

In addition, VOIs may in the future be deemed to be securities under federal or state law and therefore subject to applicable securities regulation, which could have a material adverse effect on Bluegreen due to, among other things, the cost of compliance with such regulations.

 

Environmental liabilities, including claims with respect to mold or hazardous or toxic substances, could have a material adverse impact on Bluegreen’s financial condition and operating results.

 

Under various federal, state and local laws, ordinances and regulations, as well as common law, Bluegreen may be liable for the costs of removal or remediation of certain hazardous or toxic substances, including mold, located on, in or emanating from property that Bluegreen owns, leases or operates, as well as related costs of investigation and property damage at such property. These laws often impose liability without regard to whether Bluegreen knew of, or was responsible for, the presence of the hazardous or toxic substances. The presence of such substances, or the failure to properly remediate such substances, may adversely affect Bluegreen’s ability to sell or lease its property or to borrow money using such property or receivables generated from the sale of such property as collateral. Noncompliance with environmental, health or safety requirements may require Bluegreen to cease or alter operations at one or more of its properties. Further, Bluegreen may be subject to common law claims by third parties based on damages and costs resulting from violations of environmental regulations or from contamination associated with one or more of Bluegreen’s properties.

 

A failure to maintain the integrity of internal or customer data could result in damage to Bluegreen's reputation and/or subject Bluegreen to costs, fines, or lawsuits.

 

Bluegreen's operations and activities require the collection and retention of large volumes of internal and customer data, including credit card numbers and other personally identifiable information of Bluegreen's customers and employees. The integrity and protection of that customer, employee and company data is critical to Bluegreen. If that data is inaccurate or incomplete, Bluegreen could make faulty decisions. Bluegreen's customers and employees also have a high expectation that Bluegreen will adequately protect their personal information. The information, security and privacy requirements imposed by governmental regulation are increasingly demanding. Bluegreen's systems may not be able to satisfy these changing requirements and employee and customer expectations, or may require significant additional investments or time in order to do so. Efforts to hack or breach security measures, failures of systems or software to operate as designed or intended, viruses, operator error, or inadvertent releases of data all threaten

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Bluegreen's information systems and records. Bluegreen's reliance on computer, Internet-based and mobile systems and communications and the frequency and sophistication of efforts by hackers to gain unauthorized access to such systems have increased significantly in recent years. A significant theft, loss, or fraudulent use of customer, employee, or company data could adversely impact Bluegreen's reputation and could result in remedial and other expenses, fines, or litigation and could have a material adverse impact on its results of operations and financial condition.

 

Bluegreen’s technology requires updating and the failure to keep pace with developments in technology could impair Bluegreen's operations or competitive position.

 

The vacation ownership and hospitality industries require the utilization of technology and systems, including technology utilized for sales and marketing, mortgage servicing, property management, brand assurance and compliance, and reservation systems. This technology requires continuous updating and refinements, including technology required to remain competitive and to comply with the legal requirements such as privacy regulations and requirements established by third parties. Bluegreen is currently engaged in efforts to update its information technology platform, which has required, and is likely to continue to require, significant capital expenditures. Bluegreen's older systems which have not yet been updated may increase the risk of operational inefficiencies, financial loss and non-compliance with applicable legal and regulatory requirements and Bluegreen may not be successful in updating such systems in the time frame or at the cost anticipated. Further, as a result of the rapidly changing technological environment, new systems which Bluegreen has put in place or expects to put in place in the near term may become outdated requiring new technology, and Bluegreen may not be able to replace those systems as quickly as its competition or within budgeted costs and time frames. Further, Bluegreen may not achieve the benefits that may have been anticipated from any new technology or system.

 

There are inherent uncertainties involved in estimates, judgments and assumptions used in the preparation of financial statements in accordance with GAAP. Any changes in estimates, judgments and assumptions used could have a material adverse impact on Bluegreen’s operating results and financial condition.

 

Consolidated financial statements prepared in accordance with GAAP involve making estimates, judgments and assumptions. These estimates, judgments and assumptions include, but are not limited to, those related to future cash flows, which in turn are based upon expectations of future performance given current and projected forecasts of the economy in general and the real estate markets. If any estimates, judgments or assumptions change in the future, including in the event that Bluegreen’s performance does not otherwise meet its expectations, Bluegreen may be required to record impairment charges against its earnings, which could have a material adverse impact on its operating results and financial condition. In addition, GAAP requirements as to how certain estimates are made may result, for example, in asset valuations which ultimately would not be realized if Bluegreen were to attempt to sell the asset.

 

The loss of the services of Bluegreen’s key management and personnel could adversely affect its business.

 

Bluegreen’s ability to successfully implement its business strategy will depend on its ability to attract and retain experienced and knowledgeable management and other professional staff, and Bluegreen may not be successful in doing so. If Bluegreen's efforts to retain and attract key management and other personnel are unsuccessful, Bluegreen's business, prospects, results of operations and financial condition may be materially and adversely impacted.

 

 

 

 

 

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RISKS RELATED TO BBX CAPITAL

BBX Capital is a separate public company. The following discussion was included or is derived from disclosures contained in BBX Capital’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2014 which was prepared by BBX Capital’s management and describes the risks that BBX Capital’s management currently believes to be material to BBX Capital’s operations.  References to the “Company”, “we”, “us” or “our” in the following discussion are references to BBX Capital and its subsidiaries and are not references to BFC or Bluegreen. 

 

Our business and operations and the mix of our assets significantly changed as a result of the sale of BankAtlantic to BB&T during July 2012, and our financial condition and results of operations depend on the monetization of our assets at or near their current book values and our results of operations will vary depending upon the timing of such monetization and the success of any investment of available funds.

 

As a result of the BB&T Transaction, the Company’s business and operations significantly changed from its business and operations prior to the sale of BankAtlantic. As a consequence, the Company’s financial condition and results of operations will be dependent in the near term, on our ability to successfully manage and monetize the assets currently held by BBX Partners, which held approximately $14.3 million of loans and foreclosed real estate as of December 31, 2014, the assets currently held by CAM, and the assets held in FAR and on the results of operations of Bluegreen and its ability to continue to pay dividends to Woodbridge.  Additionally, because a majority of FAR’s assets are serviced by a third party servicer, the Company is also dependent on the ability and efforts of the servicer to efficiently manage and monetize the assets. Further, nonaccrual loans and real estate may not be easily salable in the event the Company decides to liquidate an asset through a sale transaction. The Company’s financial condition and results of operations will be dependent in the longer term on these factors as well as its ability to successfully invest these cash flows. If the assets held in CAM and BBX Partners and the assets held in FAR are not monetized at or near the current book values ascribed to them, or if these assets are liquidated for amounts less than book value, the Company’s financial condition and results of operations would be adversely affected, and our ability to successfully pursue our business goals could be adversely affected. Because a majority of these assets do not generate income on a regular basis, the Company does not expect to generate significant revenue or income with respect to these assets until such time as an asset is monetized through repayments or transactions involving the sale, joint venture or development of the underlying real estate. Accordingly, the Company expects its revenues and results of operations to vary significantly on a quarterly basis and from year to year.

 

Our substantial investment in Woodbridge and our indirect interest in Bluegreen exposes us to the risks associated with Bluegreen and the vacation ownership industry.

 

As previously described, we invested $71.75 million in Woodbridge during April 2013 in exchange for a 46% equity interest in Woodbridge. Woodbridge owns all of the shares of Bluegreen’s common stock which constitute Woodbridge’s primary asset.  While Woodbridge and Bluegreen are not consolidated into our financial statements, our investment in Woodbridge is significant and our operating results and financial condition, including our liquidity, is dependent in part on Bluegreen’s performance and its ability to pay dividends. Bluegreen is subject to various risks and uncertainties which may impact its business and results, including, but not limited to, the following:

 

·

Bluegreen’s business and operations, including its ability to market Vacation Ownership Interests (“VOIs”), is subject to risks related to general economic conditions and the availability of financing;

·

The vacation ownership and hospitality industries are highly competitive, and Bluegreen may not be able to compete successfully;

·

Bluegreen would incur substantial losses and Bluegreen’s liquidity position could be adversely impacted if the customers to whom Bluegreen provides financing default on their obligations;

·

While Bluegreen has attempted to restructure its business to reduce its need for and reliance on financing for liquidity in the short term, there is no assurance that such restructuring will be successful or that Bluegreen’s business and profitability will not otherwise continue to depend on its ability to obtain financing, which may not be available on favorable terms, or at all; 

·

Bluegreen's indebtedness may impact its financial condition and results of operations, and the terms of Bluegreen's indebtedness may limit its activities;

·

The ratings of third-party rating agencies could adversely impact Bluegreen’s ability to obtain, renew or extend credit facilities, or otherwise raise funds;

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·

Bluegreen’s future success depends on its ability to market its products and services successfully and efficiently and Bluegreen’s marketing expenses may increase;

·

Bluegreen may not be successful in increasing or expanding its capital-light business relationships, and its capital-light activities, including fee based, sales and marketing, just-in-time VOI arrangements, and secondary market sales activities, and such activities may not be profitable, which may have an adverse impact on Bluegreen’s results of operations and financial condition;

·

Bluegreen’s results of operations and financial condition may be materially and adversely impacted if Bluegreen does not continue to participate in exchange networks and other strategic alliances with third parties or if Bluegreen’s customers are not satisfied with the networks in which Bluegreen participates or Bluegreen’s strategic alliances;

·

The resale market for VOIs could adversely affect Bluegreen’s business;

·

Bluegreen is subject to the risks of the real estate market and the risks associated with real estate development, including a decline in real estate values and a deterioration of other conditions relating to the real estate market and real estate development;

·

Adverse outcomes in legal or other regulatory proceedings, including claims for development-related defects, could adversely affect Bluegreen’s financial condition and operating results;

·

Bluegreen may be adversely affected by extensive federal, state and local laws and regulations and changes in applicable laws and regulations, including with respect to the imposition of additional taxes on operations. In addition, results of audits of Bluegreen’s tax returns or those of Bluegreen’s subsidiaries may have a material and adverse impact on Bluegreen’s financial condition;

·

Environmental liabilities, including claims with respect to mold or hazardous or toxic substances, could have a material adverse impact on Bluegreen’s financial condition and operating results;

·

A failure to maintain the integrity of internal or customer data could result in damage to Bluegreen's reputation and/or subject Bluegreen to costs, fines, or lawsuits;

·

Bluegreen’s technology requires updating and the failure to keep pace with developments in technology could impair Bluegreen's operations or competitive position;

·

There are inherent uncertainties involved in estimates, judgments and assumptions used in the preparation of financial statements in accordance with GAAP. Any changes in estimates, judgments and assumptions used could have a material adverse impact on Bluegreen’s operating results and financial condition; and 

·

The loss of the services of Bluegreen’s key management and personnel could adversely affect its business.

 

For more detailed information regarding Bluegreen’s business, the risks set forth above and other risks which Bluegreen faces, see BFC’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2014, which is available free of charge on the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov, including the “Risk Factors – Risks Related to Bluegreen” section thereof.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2014 and the nine months ended December 31, 2013, we received dividends totaling $52.2 million from Woodbridge following its receipt of dividends from Bluegreen.  As indicated above, Bluegreen’s debt instruments contain restrictions on its ability to pay dividends.  In addition, dividend payments by Bluegreen are subject to declaration by Bluegreen’s board of directors, and subsequent dividends by Woodbridge are subject to the approval of the board of directors of BFC as well as our board of directors.  Dividend decisions outside of our control may not be made in our best interest. If Bluegreen is unable to pay dividends or Bluegreen or Woodbridge does not otherwise pay dividends, our liquidity would be materially and adversely impacted.  See “Item 7 - Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations – Liquidity” for additional information.

 

Our future acquisitions may reduce earnings, require us to obtain additional financing and expose us to additional risks.

 

Our business strategy includes investments in or acquisitions of operating companies, such as our acquisitions of Renin Corp. and the acquisitions of businesses by BBX Sweet Holdings in the candy and confections industry.  Some of these investments and acquisitions may be material. While we will seek investments and acquisitions primarily in companies that provide opportunities for growth, we may not be successful in identifying these opportunities. Investments or acquisitions that we complete may not prove to be successful or even if successful may not initially generate income, or may generate income on an irregular basis or over a long time period, thus causing our results of operations to vary significantly on a quarterly basis and from year to year. Acquisitions may expose us to additional risks and may have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.  As part of our

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business strategy, we expect to continue to review acquisition prospects that would complement our existing business, or that might otherwise offer growth opportunities.  Acquisitions entail numerous risks, including:

 

·

Difficulties in assimilating acquired management and operations;

·

Risks associated with achieving profitability;

·

The incurrence of significant due diligence expenses relating to acquisitions that are not completed;

·

Unforeseen expenses;

·

Risks associated with entering new markets in which we have no or limited prior experience;

·

The potential loss of key employees or founders of acquired organizations; and

·

Risks associated with transferred assets and liabilities.

 

We may not be able to acquire or profitably manage additional businesses, or to integrate successfully any acquired businesses, including Renin and the businesses BBX Sweet Holdings acquired, without substantial costs, delays or other operational or financial difficulties, including difficulties in integrating information systems and personnel and establishing control environment processes across acquired businesses.  Our failure to do so could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.  In addition to the extent that we acquire operating businesses outside the United States or the State of Florida, we may face additional risks related to the compliance with foreign regulations and laws including tax laws, labor laws, currency fluctuations and geography economic conditions.

 

In addition, we will likely face competition in making investments or acquisitions which could increase the costs associated with the investment or acquisition. Our investments or acquisitions may rely on additional debt or equity financing. The issuance of debt will result in additional leverage which could limit our operating flexibility, and the issuance of equity could result in additional dilution to our then-current shareholders. In addition, such financing could consist of equity securities which have rights, preferences or privileges senior to our Class A Common Stock.

 

If we require additional financing in the future, the financing may not be available when needed or on favorable terms, if at all. Additionally, we do not intend to seek shareholder approval of any investments or acquisitions unless required by law or regulation.

 

We plan to conduct some of our operations through unconsolidated joint ventures with independent third parties in which we do not have a controlling interest, and we may be adversely impacted by a joint venture partner’s failure to fulfill its obligations. 

 

By using joint ventures, we can reduce the amount we invest in real estate properties. However, our joint venture partners may become financially unable or unwilling to fulfill their obligations under the joint venture agreements. Most joint ventures borrow money to help finance their activities, and although recourse on the loans is generally limited to the joint ventures and their properties, we may be required to provide financial support. If joint venture partners do not perform on their obligations, we may incur significant expenditures which may have an adverse effect on our operating results or financial condition.

 

Investments in real estate developments directly or through joint ventures expose us to market and economic risks inherent in the real estate construction and development industry.

 

The real estate construction and development industry is highly competitive and subject to numerous risks which in many cases are beyond management’s control.  The success of our real estate development investments is dependent on many factors, including:

 

·

Demand for or oversupply of new homes, rental apartments and commercial real estate;

·

Demand for commercial real estate tenants;

·

Real estate market values;

·

Changes in capitalization rates impacting real estate values;

·

Inventory of foreclosed homes negatively impacting selling prices;

·

Availability and reasonable pricing of skilled labor;

·

Availability and reasonable pricing of construction materials such as lumber, framing, concrete and other building materials;

·

Changes in laws and regulations for new construction and land entitlements, including environmental and zoning laws and regulations;

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·

Natural disasters and severe weather conditions increasing costs, delaying construction, causing uninsured losses or reducing demand for new homes;

·

Availability and cost of mortgage financing for potential purchasers;

·

Mortgage loan interest rates;

·

Availability, delays and costs associated with obtaining permits, approvals or licenses necessary to develop property; and

·

Construction defects and product liability claims.

 

Any of these factors could give rise to delays in the start or completion of a project, or increase the cost of developing a project, or could result in reduced prices and values for our developments, including developments underlying our joint venture investments.

 

The decline in the Florida real estate market has adversely affected, and may continue to adversely affect, our earnings and financial condition.

 

The deterioration in prior periods of economic conditions in the Florida residential real estate market, including the cumulative decline in median home prices in all major metropolitan areas in Florida, and the downturn in the Florida commercial real estate market, resulted in substantial non-performing loans and provision for loan losses during prior periods. The loans retained by us through CAM and FAR in the BB&T Transaction and the real estate properties we acquired through foreclosure or settlements with borrowers are primarily in the Florida market, and adverse changes to the Florida economy or the real estate market may negatively impact our earnings and financial condition.

 

Our loan portfolio is concentrated in loans secured by real estate, a majority of which are located in Florida, which makes us susceptible to credit losses from downturns in the real estate market.

 

Conditions in the United States real estate market deteriorated significantly beginning in 2007, particularly in Florida. Our loan portfolio is concentrated in commercial real estate loans (most of which are located in Florida), residential mortgages (nationwide), and consumer home-equity loans (mainly in Florida). We have a heightened exposure to credit losses that may arise from this concentration as a result of the significant downturn in the Florida real estate markets.

 

An increase in our allowance for loan losses will result in reduced earnings.

 

We are exposed to the risk that our borrowers will be unable to repay their loans according to their terms and that any collateral securing the payment of these loans will not be sufficient to assure full repayment. Management evaluates the collectability of the loan portfolio and provides an allowance for loan losses that it believes is adequate based upon such factors as:

 

·

the risk characteristics of various classifications of loans;

·

previous loan loss experience;

·

specific loans that have probable loss potential;

·

delinquency trends;

·

estimated fair value of the collateral; and

·

current economic conditions.

 

Many of these factors are difficult to predict or estimate accurately, particularly in a changing economic environment. The process of determining the estimated losses inherent in our loan portfolio requires subjective and complex judgments and the level of uncertainty concerning economic conditions may adversely affect our ability to estimate the losses which may be incurred in the loan portfolio. If such evaluation is incorrect and borrower defaults cause losses exceeding the portion of the allowance for loan losses allocated to those loans, or if perceived adverse trends require us to significantly increase our allowance for loan losses in the future, the Company’s earnings could be significantly and adversely affected.

 

Non-performing loans take significant time to resolve and adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition, and could result in further losses in the future.

 

At December 31, 2014, our non-performing loans totaled approximately $17.8 million or 64% of our total loan portfolio. Our non-performing loans adversely affect our net income through foreclosure costs, operating expenses

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and taxes. Until we monetize these loans, we expect to continue to incur additional losses relating to these non-performing loans. We record interest income on non-performing loans on a cash basis. When we receive the collateral in foreclosures or similar proceedings, we are required to mark the related collateral to the then fair market value, generally based on appraisals of the property obtained by us. These loans also increase our risk profile, and increases in the level of non-performing loans adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition. While we seek to manage nonperforming loans, decreases in the value of these loans or deterioration in the financial condition of our borrowers, which is often impacted by economic and market conditions beyond our control, could adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition. In addition, the resolution of non-performing loans requires significant commitments of management time.

 

FAR’s consumer loan portfolio is concentrated in home equity loans collateralized by properties located in South Florida.

 

The decline in residential real estate prices and higher unemployment throughout Florida over the past several years has resulted in an increase in mortgage delinquencies and higher foreclosure rates. Additionally, in response to adverse conditions in the economy and real estate markets, financial institutions and other lenders have tightened underwriting standards which has limited the ability of borrowers to refinance. These conditions have adversely impacted delinquencies and credit loss trends for home equity loan portfolios. The majority of FAR’s home equity loans are residential second mortgages that exhibit higher loss severity than residential first mortgages. If home prices decline, FAR may experience higher credit losses from this loan portfolio. Since the collateral for this portfolio consists primarily of second mortgages, it is unlikely that FAR will be successful in recovering all or any portion of its loan proceeds in the event of a default unless FAR is prepared to repay the first mortgage and such repayment and the costs associated with a foreclosure are justified by the value of the property.

 

The cost and outcome of pending legal proceedings may impact the Company’s results of operations.

 

The Company is involved in ongoing litigation which has resulted in significant selling, general and administrative expenses relating to legal and other professional fees. Pending proceedings include litigation brought by the SEC, litigation arising out of workouts and foreclosures, and legal proceedings associated with BankAtlantic’s tax certificate business. As discussed under Item 3. Legal Proceeding, the jury in the SEC action found that BBX Capital and our Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Alan B. Levan had engaged in an act of fraud or deceit toward shareholders or prospective investors by making materially false statements knowingly or with severe recklessness (1) with respect to three statements made in a July 25, 2007 conference call referenced above, and (2) in their decision to sell certain loans in the fourth quarter of 2007 and failing to classify the loans as held-for sale in the 2007 Annual Report on Form 10-K.  The jury also found that Mr. Levan made or caused to be made false statements to the independent accountants regarding the held for sale issue. While BBX Capital and Mr. Levan intend to appeal any adverse judgment to the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals, the results of appellate review are uncertain and we anticipate continued elevated legal and related costs in connection with the actions. We have received legal fee and cost reimbursements from our insurance carrier in connection with the SEC action of approximately $5.8 million as of December 31, 2014.  Our insurance carrier has indicated it may seek reimbursement for costs, charges and expenses advanced in connection with this matter and these potential insurance carrier reimbursements would adversely impact our financial condition and results of operations. 

 

Adverse market conditions may affect our business and results of operations.

 

Our financial condition and results of operations have been, and may continue to be, adversely impacted as a result of the downturn in the U.S. housing and commercial real estate markets and general economic conditions. Dramatic declines in the national and, in particular, Florida housing markets over the past years, with falling home prices and increasing foreclosures and unemployment, negatively impacted the credit performance of our loans and resulted in significant asset impairments. While we believe that real estate markets and general economic conditions have shown signs of improvement during the past year, further negative market and economic developments may cause adverse changes in payment patterns, causing increases in delinquencies and default rates, and may impact charge-offs and provisions for loan losses and the value of our real estate and other real estate related assets. A worsening of conditions would likely exacerbate the adverse effects of these difficult market conditions.

 

Adverse events in Florida, where our business is currently concentrated, could adversely impact our results and future growth.

 

Our business, the primary source of repayment for loans and the real estate collateralizing loans and real estate acquired through foreclosure or settlements with borrowers and are investments in real estate joint ventures are

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primarily concentrated in Florida. As a result, we are exposed to geographic risks, as high unemployment rates, declines in the housing industry and declines in the real estate market have generally been more severe in Florida than in the rest of the country. Adverse changes in laws and regulations in Florida would have a negative impact on our revenues, financial condition and business. Further, the State of Florida is subject to the risks of natural disasters such as tropical storms and hurricanes, which may disrupt our operations, adversely impact the ability of our borrowers to timely repay their loans, adversely impact the value of any collateral securing loans and our portfolio of real estate (both held-for-sale and held-for-investment), or otherwise have an adverse effect on our results of operations. The severity and impact of tropical storms, hurricanes and other weather related events are unpredictable.

 

Renin sales are concentrated with two significant customers.  

 

A significant amount of Renin’s sales are to big-box home centers.  These home centers in many instances have significant negotiating leverage with their vendors, and are able to affect the prices Renin receives for its products and the terms and conditions on which Renin conducts its business with them.  These home centers may also reduce the number of vendors they purchase from or make significant changes in their volume of purchases. Although homebuilders, dealers and other retailers represent other channels of distribution for Renin’s products, the loss of a home center customer or reduced sales volume from any of these home centers would have a material adverse effect on Renin’s business.

 

A significant portion of Renin’s business relies on home improvement and new home construction activity, both of which are cyclical and outside of management’s control.

 

A significant portion of Renin’s business in Canada and the United States is dependent on the levels of home improvement activity, including spending on repair and remodeling projects, and new home construction activity. Macroeconomic conditions including consumer confidence levels, fluctuations in home prices, unemployment and underemployment levels, interest rates, regulatory initiatives, and the availability of home equity loans and mortgage financing affect both discretionary spending on home improvement projects as well as new home construction activity. Adverse changes in these factors or uncertainty regarding these macroeconomic conditions could result in a decline in spending on home improvement projects and a decline in demand for new home construction, both of which could adversely affect Renin’s results of operations.

 

The results of our operating businesses, Renin and the BBX Sweet Holdings companies, would be negatively impacted if they experience increased commodity costs or a limited availability of commodities.

 

Our operating businesses purchase various commodities to manufacture products, including steel, aluminum, glass, and mirror, in the case of Renin, and sugar and cocoa, in the case of BBX Sweet Holdings. Fluctuations in the availability and prices of these commodities could increase the cost to manufacture products. Further, increases in energy costs could increase production costs as well as transportation costs, each of which could negatively affect these businesses operating results.   Renin’s and BBX Sweet Holdings’ existing arrangements with customers, competitive considerations and the relative negotiating power and resistance of  home center customers and big-box retailers to price increases make it difficult to increase selling prices to absorb increased production costs. If Renin and BBX Sweet Holdings are not able to increase the prices of its products or achieve other cost savings or productivity improvements to offset any increased commodity and production costs, our operating results could be negatively impacted.

 

Unexpected events, such as natural disasters, severe weather and terrorist activities may disrupt Renin’s operations and increase its production costs.

 

 The occurrence of one or more unexpected events, including tsunamis, hurricanes, earthquakes, floods and other forms of severe weather or terrorist activities in countries or regions in which Renin’s suppliers are located could adversely affect Renin’s operations and financial performance. Natural disasters, acts or threats of war or terrorism, or other unexpected events could result in temporary or long-term disruption in the delivery or supply of necessary raw materials and component products from Renin’s suppliers, which would disrupt Renin’s production capabilities and likely increase its cost of doing business.

 

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Market demand for confections could decline.

 

BBX Sweet Holdings and its acquired businesses operate in highly competitive markets and compete with larger companies that have greater resources.  The success of these businesses is impacted by many factors, including the following:

 

 

 

 

 

·

Effective retail execution;

 

·

Appropriate advertising campaigns and marketing programs;

 

·

Adequate supply of commodities at a reasonable cost;

 

·

Oversight of product safety;

 

·

Response to changes in consumer preferences and tastes; and

 

·

Changes in consumer health concerns, including obesity and the consumption of certain ingredients.

 

A decline in market demand for confection products could negatively affect our operating results.

 

BBX Sweet Holdings product recall or product liability claims could materially and adversely affect us.

 

Selling products for human consumption involves inherent legal and other risks, including product contamination, spoilage, product tampering, allergens, or other adulteration. We could decide or be required to destroy inventory, recall products or lose sales in connection with contamination, tampering, adulteration or other deficiencies.  These events could result in significant losses and may damage our reputation, and discourage consumers from buying our products, or cause production and delivery disruptions which would adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.  We may also incur losses if our products cause injury, illness or death.  A significant product liability claim may adversely affect our reputation and profitability, even if the claim is unsuccessful.

 

Our financial performance may adversely affect our ability to access capital and may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Our ability to fund operations and investment opportunities may depend on our ability to raise capital in the secondary markets and on our ability to monetize our portfolio of non-performing loans. Our ability to raise additional capital will depend on, among other things, conditions in the financial markets at the time, which are outside of our control, as well as litigation and our financial condition, results of operations and prospects. The failure to obtain capital in amounts needed to fund operations or anticipated investments may have a material adverse effect on our results of operation and financial condition.

 

We are controlled by BFC and its controlling shareholders, and this control position may adversely affect the market price of our Class A Common Stock.

 

BFC currently owns 8,133,353 shares of our Class A Common Stock, representing approximately 51% of the outstanding shares of such stock and all 195,045 outstanding shares of our Class B Common Stock representing approximately 72% of our total voting power. Additionally, Alan B. Levan, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of BBX Capital and Chairman, Chief Executive Officer and President of BFC, and John E. Abdo, Vice Chairman of BBX Capital and BFC, collectively beneficially own shares of BFC’s Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock representing approximately 74% of BFC’s total voting power. BBX Capital’s Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock vote as a single group on most matters. Accordingly, BFC, directly, and Messrs. Levan and Abdo, indirectly through BFC, are in a position to control BBX Capital, elect BBX Capital’s board of directors and significantly influence the outcome of any shareholder vote. This control position may have an adverse effect on the market price of our Class A Common Stock.

 

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BFC can reduce its economic interest in us and still maintain voting control.

 

Our Class A Common Stock and Class B Common Stock generally vote together as a single class, with the Class A Common Stock possessing a fixed 53% of the aggregate voting power of the Company, and the Class B Common Stock possessing a fixed 47% of such aggregate voting power. The Company’s Class B Common Stock currently represents less than 1% of the Company’s total common equity and 47% of the Company’s total voting power. As a result, the voting power of the Company’s Class B Common Stock does not bear a direct relationship to the economic interest represented by the shares.

 

Any issuance of shares of Class A Common Stock will further dilute the relative economic interest of the Class B Common Stock, but will not decrease the voting power represented by the Class B Common Stock. Further, our Restated Articles of Incorporation provide that these relative voting percentages will remain fixed until such time as BFC and its affiliates own less than 97,253 shares of the Class B Common Stock, which is approximately 50% of the number of shares of Class B Common Stock that BFC now owns, even if additional shares of Class A Common Stock are issued. Therefore, BFC may sell up to approximately 50% of its shares of Class B Common Stock (after converting those shares to shares of Class A Common Stock), and significantly reduce its economic interest in us, while still maintaining its voting power. If BFC were to take this action, it would widen the disparity between the equity interest represented by the Class B Common Stock and its voting power. Any conversion of shares of Class B Common Stock into shares of Class A Common Stock would further dilute the voting interests of the holders of the Class A Common Stock.

 

Provisions in our Restated Articles of Incorporation and Amended and Restated Bylaws, and recently adopted shareholder rights plan, may make it difficult for a third party to acquire us and could depress the price of our Class A Common Stock.

 

Our Restated Articles of Incorporation and Amended and Restated Bylaws contain provisions that could delay, defer or prevent a change of control of the Company or its management. These provisions could make it more difficult for shareholders to elect directors and take other corporate actions. As a result, these provisions could limit the price that investors are willing to pay in the future for shares of our Class A Common Stock. These provisions include:

 

·

the provisions in the Restated Articles of Incorporation regarding the voting rights of Class B Common Stock;

·

the authority of the board of directors to issue additional shares of common or preferred stock and to fix the relative rights and preferences of the preferred stock without additional shareholder approval; and

·

advance notice procedures to be complied with by shareholders in order to make shareholder proposals or nominate directors. 

 

In addition, on February 7, 2013, the Company adopted a shareholder rights plan which is designed to preserve certain tax benefits available to the Company. However, because the rights plan provides a deterrent to investors from acquiring a 5% or greater ownership interest in Class A Common Stock, it may have an anti-takeover effect.

 

The loss of key personnel or the failure to attract and retain highly qualified personnel could adversely affect our operations.

 

Our performance is largely dependent on the talents and efforts of skilled individuals. Our business operations could be adversely affected if we are unable to retain and motivate our existing employees and attract new employees as needed. In addition, as previously described, the jury in the SEC action found that BBX Capital and our Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Alan B. Levan committed violations of federal securities laws. While BBX Capital and Mr. Levan intend to appeal any adverse judgment to the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals, the results of appellate review are uncertain. In addition to injunctive relief and monetary penalties of $5.2 million against the Company and $1.56 million against Mr. Levan, the SEC is seeking an officer and director bar with respect to Mr. Levan. While we continue to believe that the Company and Mr. Levan fully complied with applicable law, the jury verdict represents a finding of violations of securities laws involving the making of materially false statements knowingly or with severe recklessness and the outcome of an appeal is uncertain. If the findings of fraud by the Company and/or Mr. Levan are upheld, this may adversely affect the Company’s assessment of internal controls over financial reporting.  In the event Mr. Levan is restricted from serving, or is otherwise unable to serve, as an executive officer and/or director of BBX Capital, BBX Capital and its business, as well as the businesses of its subsidiaries, may be adversely impacted.  However, the Company believes that any such adverse impact would be mitigated by the

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continuation of service of other executive officers, including Mr. Abdo, who serves as a director and Vice Chairman of the Company and Jarett Levan, President, who previously served as President and CEO of BankAtlantic. 

 

Information technology failures and data security breaches could harm our business. 

We rely extensively on information technology (IT) systems, including Internet sites, data hosting facilities and other hardware and platforms, some of which are hosted by third parties, to assist in conducting our businesses. Our IT systems, like those of most companies, may be vulnerable to a variety of interruptions, including, but not limited to, natural disasters, telecommunications failures, hackers, and other security issues. Moreover, our computer systems, like those of most companies, are subjected to computer viruses or other malicious codes, and to cyber or phishing-attacks. Although we have implemented administrative and technical controls and taken other actions to minimize the risk of cyber incidents and protect our information technology, computer intrusion efforts are becoming increasingly sophisticated, and even the enhanced controls we have installed might be breached. If our IT systems cease to function properly, we could suffer interruptions in our operations. If our cyber-security is breached, unauthorized persons may gain access to proprietary or confidential information, including information about borrowers, employees or investments. This could damage our reputation and require us to incur significant costs to repair or restore the security of our computer systems.

 

 

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ITEM 1B.  UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

 

None.

 

 

 

 

ITEM 2.  PROPERTIES

 

The principal executive offices of BFC and BBX Capital are located at 401 East Las Olas Boulevard, Suite 800, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, 33301.  BBX Capital leases the space pursuant to an office lease with a term of 66 months and an expiration date of June 1, 2018.  BBX Capital has the right to renew the lease for two additional terms of five years commencing on the expiration date. BFC subleases certain of the office space from BBX Capital pursuant to an agreement where BFC reimburses BBX Capital for the costs associated with such space.

 

Bluegreen’s principal executive office is located in Boca Raton, Florida in 158,838 square feet of leased space. At December 31, 2014, Bluegreen also maintained sales offices at 23 of its resorts as well as regional administrative offices in Orlando, Florida and Indianapolis, Indiana. For a description of Bluegreen’s resort properties, that are part of the Bluegreen Vacation Club, please see “Item 1 Business —Products and Services – Vacation Club Resort Locations”.

 

BBX Capital leases office space in Orlando with a lease expiration date of August 31, 2015 and BBX Sweet Holdings has two office space leases in California with lease expiration dates of June 30, 2015 and October 31, 2015.

 

Renin leases its executive offices located at 110 Walker Drive, Brampton, Ontario. The office lease expiration date is December 31, 2024.  Renin leases two manufacturing facilities and one sales and distribution facility. The United Kingdom sales and distribution facility is leased month-to-month.  The two manufacturing facilities in the United States and Canada have lease expiration dates of December 31, 2022 and December 31, 2024.

 

Hoffman’s owns its chocolate manufacturing facility located at 5190 Lake Worth Road, Greenacres, Florida.  The facility is comprised of a 4,000 square foot office and store front area and an 11,526 square foot manufacturing area.  Hoffman’s also owns two warehouse facilities in Riviera Beach, Florida.

 

Hoffman’s leases three of its retail locations in West Palm Beach, Florida with lease expiration dates ranging from June 30, 2017 to December 31, 2019. Hoffman’s leases three retail locations in Broward County, Florida with lease expiration dates ranging from December 31, 2019 to June 30, 2020.

 

Williams and Bennett leases its chocolate manufacturing facility located at 2045 High Ridge Road, Boynton Beach, Florida. The facility is comprised of 30,000 square feet of office, manufacturing, warehousing and food storage areas. 

 

Helen Grace sub-leases its chocolate manufacturing facility located at 10690 Long Beach Boulevard, Lynwood, California with a lease expiration date of June 2015.  The manufacturing facility is comprised of 50,000 square feet of office, manufacturing, warehousing and food storage areas.

 

Helen Grace leases three retail locations in California with lease expiration dates from April 30, 2015 to April 30, 2017. 

 

Anastasia leases its chocolate manufacturing facility located at 1815 Cypress Lake Drive, Orlando, Florida with an expiration date of September 30, 2019 with three additional option terms of five years each commencing as of the expiration date. The facility is comprised of 80,000 square feet of office, manufacturing, warehousing and food storage areas. 

 

 

 

 

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ITEM 3.  LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

 

BFC and its Wholly Owned Subsidiaries

 

In the ordinary course of business, BFC and its subsidiaries are parties to lawsuits as plaintiff or defendant involving its operations and activities. Although BFC and its subsidiaries believe that they have meritorious defenses in all current legal actions, the outcome of litigation and regulatory matters and timing of ultimate resolution are inherently difficult to predict and uncertain.

 

Woodbridge Holdings, LLC v. Prescott Group Aggressive Small Cap Master Fund, G.P., Cede & Co., William J. Maeck, Ravenswood Investments III, L.P., and The Ravenswood Investment Company, Circuit Court, 17th Judicial Circuit, Broward County, Florida

 

Under Florida law, holders of shares of Class A Common Stock of Woodbridge Holdings Corporation (“WHC”) who did not vote to approve BFC’s September 2009 merger with WHC and who properly asserted and exercised their appraisal rights with respect to their shares are entitled to receive a cash payment in an amount equal to the fair value of their shares (as determined in accordance with Florida law) in lieu of the shares of BFC’s Class A Common Stock which they would otherwise have been entitled to receive. In accordance with Florida law, Woodbridge Holdings, LLC, the successor to WHC, provided written notices and required forms to the dissenting shareholders setting forth, among other things, its determination that the fair value of WHC’s Class A Common Stock immediately prior to the effectiveness of the merger was $1.10 per share. Dissenting shareholders, who collectively held approximately 4.2 million shares of WHC’s Class A Common Stock, rejected Woodbridge’s offer of $1.10 per share and requested payment for their shares based on their respective fair value estimates of WHC’s Class A Common Stock.  Under Florida law, Woodbridge thereafter commenced the appraisal rights action.  In December 2009, a $4.6 million liability was recorded with a corresponding reduction to additional paid-in capital representing, in the aggregate, Woodbridge’s offer to the dissenting shareholders. On July 5, 2012, the presiding court determined the fair value of the dissenting shareholders’ shares of WHC’s Class A Common Stock to be $1.78 per share and awarded legal and other costs in favor of the dissenting shareholders.  As a result, the $4.6 million liability was increased to approximately $7.5 million as of September 30, 2012 (with a corresponding reduction to additional paid in capital of $2.8 million) to account for the per share value awarded. On March 11, 2013, the court awarded legal fees and pre and post judgment interest to the dissenting shareholders for a total award of approximately $11.9 million (including the $7.5 million based on the $1.78 per share value determination).  As a result, the liability was increased by approximately $4.4 million during the fourth quarter 2012 to $11.9 million as of December 31, 2012. Woodbridge has appealed the courts’ ruling with respect to the fair value determination and the award of legal fees and costs and posted a $13.4 million bond in connection with the appeal. The outcome of the appeal is uncertain.

 

In Re Bluegreen Corporation Shareholder Litigation

 

Between November 16, 2011 and February 13, 2012, seven purported class action lawsuits related to the previously proposed stock-for-stock merger between BFC, which at that time was the sole member of Woodbridge, and Bluegreen were filed against Bluegreen, the members of Bluegreen’s board of directors, BFC and BXG Florida Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Woodbridge formed for the purposes of the merger (“BXG Merger Sub”). As described below, four of these lawsuits have been consolidated into a single action in Florida, and the other three lawsuits have been consolidated into a single action in Massachusetts and stayed in favor of the Florida action. Further information regarding each of these lawsuits is set forth below.

 

The four Florida lawsuits, captioned and styled Ronald Kirkland v. Bluegreen Corporation et al. (filed on November 16, 2011); Richard Harriman v. Bluegreen Corporation et al. (filed on November 22, 2011); Alfred Richner v. Bluegreen Corporation et al. (filed on December 2, 2011); and BHR Master Fund, LTD et al. v. Bluegreen Corporation et al. (filed on February 13, 2012) were consolidated into an action styled In Re Bluegreen Corporation Shareholder Litigation. On April 9, 2012, the plaintiffs filed a consolidated amended class action complaint which alleged that the individual director defendants breached their fiduciary duties by (i) agreeing to sell Bluegreen without first taking steps to ensure adequate, fair and maximum consideration, (ii) engineering a transaction to benefit themselves and not the shareholders, and (iii) failing to protect the interests of Bluegreen’s minority shareholders. In the complaint, the plaintiffs also alleged that BFC breached its fiduciary duties to Bluegreen’s minority shareholders and that BXG Merger Sub aided and abetted the alleged breaches of fiduciary duties by Bluegreen’s directors and BFC. In addition, the complaint included allegations relating to claimed violations of Massachusetts law. The complaint sought declaratory and injunctive relief, along with damages and attorneys’ fees and costs.

 

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The three Massachusetts lawsuits were filed in the Superior Court for Suffolk County in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and styled as follows: Gaetano Bellavista Caltagirone v. Bluegreen Corporation et al. (filed on November 16, 2011); Alan W. Weber and J.B. Capital Partners L.P. v. Bluegreen Corporation et al. (filed on November 29, 2011); and Barry Fieldman, as Trustee for the Barry & Amy Fieldman Family Trust v. Bluegreen Corporation et al. (filed on December 6, 2011). In their respective complaints, the plaintiffs alleged that the individual director defendants breached their fiduciary duties by agreeing to sell Bluegreen without first taking steps to ensure adequate, fair and maximum consideration. The Fieldman and Weber actions contained the same claim against BFC. In addition, the complaints included claims that BXG Merger Sub, in the case of the Fieldman action, BFC and BXG Merger Sub, in the case of the Caltagirone action, and Bluegreen, in the case of the Weber action, aided and abetted the alleged breaches of fiduciary duties. On January 17, 2012, the three Massachusetts lawsuits were consolidated into a single action styled In Re Bluegreen Corp. Shareholder Litigation, which is presently stayed in favor of the Florida action.

 

Following the public announcement of the termination of the stock-for-stock merger agreement and the entry into the Bluegreen-Woodbridge Cash Merger Agreement during November 2012, the plaintiffs in the Florida action filed a motion for leave to file a supplemental complaint in order to challenge the structure of, and consideration received by Bluegreen’s shareholders in the Bluegreen-Woodbridge Cash Merger. On November 30, 2012, the Florida court granted the plaintiffs’ motion, and the supplemental complaint was deemed filed as of that date. The supplemental complaint alleges that the merger consideration remained inadequate and continued to be unfair to Bluegreen’s minority shareholders.

 

On January 25, 2013, the plaintiffs in the Florida action filed a Second Amended Class Action Complaint that asserts claims for (i) breach of fiduciary duties against the individual director defendants, BFC, and Woodbridge, (ii) aiding and abetting breaches of fiduciary duties against Bluegreen, BFC, Woodbridge, and Merger Sub, and (iii) a violation of the section of the Massachusetts Business Corporation Act regarding the approval of conflict of interest transactions and seek to recover damages. Class action certification was granted to the plaintiffs in the Second Amended Class Action Complaint by Order dated December 18, 2013.

 

As previously described, the Bluegreen-Woodbridge Cash Merger was consummated on April 2, 2013. However, the actions related to the transaction remain pending, with the plaintiffs seeking to recover damages in connection with the transaction. BFC and Bluegreen believe that these lawsuits are without merit and intend to defend against them vigorously.

 

Litigation Relating to the Previously Proposed BFC-BBX Capital Merger

 

On May 30, 2013, Haim Ronan filed a purported class action against BFC, BBX Merger Sub, BBX Capital and the members of BBX Capital’s board of directors seeking to represent BBX Capital’s shareholders in a lawsuit challenging the previously proposed merger between BFC and BBX Capital. In this action, which was styled Haim Ronan, On Behalf of Himself and All Others Similarly Situated, v. Alan B. Levan, John E. Abdo, Jarett S. Levan, Steven M. Coldren, Bruno L. Di Giulian, Charlie C. Winningham, II, David A. Lieberman, Willis N. Holcombe, Anthony P. Segreto, BBX Capital Corporation, BFC Financial Corporation and BBX Merger Sub, LLC and was filed in the Circuit Court of the 17​th Judicial Circuit in and for Broward County, Florida, Mr. Ronan asserted as a cause of action that the individual defendants breached their fiduciary duties of care, loyalty and good faith, in part, by failing to obtain a high enough price for the shares of BBX Capital’s Class A Common Stock to be acquired by BFC in the merger. Mr. Ronan also asserted a cause of action against BFC and Merger Sub for aiding and abetting the alleged breaches of fiduciary duties. Mr. Ronan sought an injunction blocking the proposed merger. On May 31, 2013, in an action styled John P. Lauterbach, on Behalf of Himself and All Others Similarly Situated, v. BBX Capital Corporation, John E. Abdo, Norman H. Becker, Steven M. Coldren, Bruno L. Di Giulian, John K. Grelle, Willis N. Holcombe, Alan B. Levan, Jarett S. Levan, David A. Lieberman, Anthony P. Segreto, Charlie C. Winningham II, Seth M. Wise, BFC Financial Corporation and BBX Merger Sub, LLC and filed in the Circuit Court of the 17​th Judicial Circuit in and for Broward County, Florida, John P. Lauterbach filed a purported class action against all of the defendants named in Mr. Ronan’s complaint, challenging the merger for substantially the same reasons as set forth in Mr. Ronan’s complaint, but asserting an additional, direct cause of action for breach of fiduciary duties against BFC, Alan B. Levan and John E. Abdo. Mr. Lauterbach also added as defendants Norman H. Becker, who was appointed to BBX Capital’s board of directors on May 7, 2013, as well as Seth M. Wise, who serves as an executive officer and director of BFC and as an executive officer of BBX Capital, and John K. Grelle, an executive officer of BFC and BBX Capital. On September 4, 2013, the Ronan and Lauterbach actions were consolidated into a single action styled In Re BBX Capital Corporation Shareholder Litigation, with the complaint filed in the